Week End Wrap Up • 11.21.14

Nov21-2014

The Urbanite on Vogue DotsMauka: “‘Way With Silence’ starts a percussive clapping that builds into desolate vocals, a desparation, a sadness. The music becomes repetitive and monotonous while the vocals keep you captivated with a rolling melody. By the end it becomes pseudo-industrial in its synthetic drumming ending not with a bang, but a whimper. Much of the short four tracks follow this sort of pattern. It’s more about the emotion peddled through textures than it is about actual music. That’s not a bad thing, certainly it’s different. By the end it reaces its apex picking up the pace, sounding more aggressive while maintaining niceties, it almost seems proper in its climax.”

Read the whole review HERE (p. 8)

The Brunswickian on “Way With Silence” from Vogue Dots: “In late October, New Brunswick’s Vogue Dots released their four-song EP, Mauka. The record was primarily written and recorded in a cottage in Belle Isle, but that doesn’t mean it is filled with simplistic campfire songs. The electronic duo use synths and killer vocals from singer Babette Hayward to create a refreshing product that conjures up images of a late night cityscape, not a cottage in the middle of the woods.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Quick Before It Melts shares details of By Divine Right‘s tribute to Depeche Mode: “Earlier in the month, By Divine Right released a second track from the forthcoming Speak and Spell tribute album Quick Before It Melts first mentioned back in September. The record takes Depeche Mode’s classic 1981 debut album–the only one in the band’s catalogue written by founding member Vince Clarke before his departure–and digs beneath its synth pop surface to discover its hidden musicality, and that, as José Contreras says he always suspected, ‘[Speak and Spell] would make a killer By Divine Right record.’ After teasing listeners with the iconic ‘Just Can’t Get Enough,’ By Divine Right are now sharing ‘New Life’ ahead of the full record release, scheduled for early 2015 on Headless Owl Records.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Sous Casa on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “It would be easy to focus on Tamara’s voice; it’s beautiful and strong (there’s a reason she’s been asked to sing harmonies for some of the biggest names), but still cracks with tenderness when required. The smokiness is as inviting as an evening campfire, but her passion burns long after the sun starts to rise over the horizon. What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know is an EP, but it’s delivered with patience and full of well thought out arrangements that help it feel like a longer record. Somehow songs built on uncertainty and self doubt oozes confidence. This EP will be followed up by a full length in 2015, but these six songs already let the music world know that Tamara is one of the best writers we have to offer.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! shares details of Headless Owl‘s toast to The Burning Hell frontman, Mathias Kom with My Name Is Mathias: A Tribute to the Songs of Mathias Kom: “Mathias Kom has been releasing music for the better part of a decade with his band the Burning Hell, and evidently he’s made a big impression on a lot of people. This much is clear from My Name Is Mathias: A Tribute to the Songs of Mathias Kom, a new album from Headless Owl Records that’s packed with cover songs from notable contributors. The album features contributors such as Dan Mangan, Great Lake Swimmers, John K. Samson of the Weakerthans, Michael Feuerstack, Mike O’Neill of the Inbreds, Dave Bidini of Rheostatics, Jenny Omnichord, Kim Barlow, Construction & Destruction, Nick Ferrio and more.”

Read the whole review HERE.

CBC Radio 3 champions Mardeen and urges them to put out a new record: “It’s been just two years since Cape Breton’s amazing Mardeen, the Weezer of Canada, released their last album (Miss You Forever, 2012), BUT: with rumours swirling that Alvvays’s hit song ‘Archie, Marry Me’ is about Mardeen guitarist Archie Rankin, it seems Mardeen should be riding the wave with an ‘answer’ song ASAP. The only potentially awkward part is that Archie is actually cousins with Molly Rankin, and related to at least one other member of Alvvays. What happens in the Maritimes stays in the Maritimes. Don’t judge! Also: Mo Kenney’s (no family relation) new single is a Mardeen cover. The time is now, Mardeen!”

See the whole list HERE.

This week, Rain Over St. Ambrose released a teaser trailer for their forthcoming record. Check it out below:

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the !earshot charts this week:

Weekly Top 50 National Charts:
#23 – Legato Vipers – LV
#50 – Dean Drouillard - UFO Houses

Week End Wrap Up • 11.14.14

Nov14-2014

The Chronicle Herald features Dan MacCormack and his new album, Symphony of Ghosts: “Halifax singer-songwriter Dan MacCormack got out of a writer’s block when he came across a line from a David Adams Richards novel. That launched him on a five-year journey of reading over 15 novels — twice — by Richards and writing 10 songs for his first solo CD, Symphony of Ghosts. The first song, ‘Face Your Hunters,’ takes its chorus from the Richards line, ‘You either face your hunters or run from them,’ from the novel For Those Who Hunt The Wounded Down. ‘The quote so perfectly captured what I was writing about in my song that I decided to scrap my song and build the song around the character in the book,’ says MacCormack.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

The Coast on Dan MacCormack‘s Symphony of Ghosts: “Dan MacCormack’s latest album, October’s Symphony of Ghosts, lives in the fertile valley between folk and literature. MacCormack’s album was the result of six years of work, picking away his concept of an entire album based on the 15—now 16—novels of David Adams Richards. Dubbed ‘literary folk,’ MacCormack’s inspiration for the album came from Adams Richards’ rich written world and his humble, enthralling characters.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Dan MacCormack stops by Global Morning Halifax for an interview and performance. Check it out below.

Exclaim! reviews Nova Scotia Music Week sets by Ria Mae, Alert The Medic, The Brood, Cam Smith, Monomyth, SoHo Ghetto, Quiet Parade, Like A Motorcycle, Dance Movie, and Blue Rodeo. See all the reviews HERE.

The Chronicle Herald on Nova Scotia Music Week: “After plying its melodic wares at opposite ends of the province, from Yarmouth and the South Shore to Sydney, Nova Scotia Music Week finally set its sights on the heart of the region this year, and scored a bullseye in Truro. The town’s venues were packed to capacity on Saturday night, even the afternoon blues matinee at Champion’s had patrons lining up hours beforehand, and the daytime conference hosted by Music Nova Scotia drew musicians and managers from across the province, and delegates from around the world to the Holiday Inn Truro’s ballrooms.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Cape Breton post on The Town Heroes, who took home five awards at Nova Scotia Music Week: “The Town Heroes went five for five, taking home every music award they were nominated for Sunday at Nova Scotia Music Week. The Inverness County duo, featuring Mike Ryan of Inverness and Bruce Gillis of Mabou, won entertainer of the year, digital artist of the year, group recording of the year for ‘Sunday Movies,’ music video of the tear for ‘Holdin’ Up Grants,’ directed by Dillon Garland, and rock recording of the year for Sunday Movies.”

Read the whole freature HERE.

The Star Phoenix on Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “The overall theme of the album seems to be one of a dangerous world in which we all have to watch out for ourselves and our loved ones. Don’t trust anything is the message of ‘Neighbourhood.’ Watch, a mid-tempo rock number with a bit of a Chris Isaak feel to it. The easy rock of ‘Nostalgia’ and the acoustic ‘Dreamer’ paint pictures of places we go to get away from that suspicion and mistrust. Love is a good place to go, too. Check out the standout track ‘Rearview,’ with its lovely guitar and harmonica opening.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Coast on The Constantines: “‘It feels good, playing those tunes again,’ says Steve ‘Baby Eagle’ Lambke of Constantines, one of Canada’s most-loved indie rock bands. The London-Toronto group has reunited after cooling down in 2010. In June, the Cons reissued their 2003 hit record for Sub Pop, Shine a Light, with vinyl bonuses. ‘It’s been out of print for a long time and people have been asking us about it for years,’ says Lambke, adding that the reissue is as much a nostalgic effort as a commitment to the future. A reunion at SappyFest 9 this August was an explosive performance for both die-hards and brand new fans.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Telegram on The Constantines: “Years apart couldn’t alter the musical chemistry of The Constantines. The Toronto-based indie band stopped gigging in 2010 after more than a decade of making records together, going their own ways to work on separate projects. ‘At the time, I don’t know if we knew whether it was a breakup or a slowing down,’ said band member Steve Lambke. ‘We kind of got to the point where it was time to start writing another (record), and I don’t think any of us really felt emotionally up to it, or maybe creatively up to it, at that time. So we just needed to take a step back and try other things.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Telescope on Legato VipersLV: “It can’t be easy trying to make it as an instrumental beach band in Guelph. Then again, one gets the sense, upon taking LV for a spin, that these dudes—they play in Bry Webb and the Providers, Del Bel, Skeletones Four and more—are doing this primarily for kicks. This is no comedic venture, however—these Vipers are pulling off a slick and sober homage to the ’60s in the vein of Dick Dale and Shadowy Men (it should be noted, Shadowy Men On A Shadowy Planet, by their own declaration, are ‘not a fucking surf band’) that can be visualized as easily as it’s listened to.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! unveils details of the new, upcoming self-titled album from Del Bel: “Toronto/Guelph outfit Del Bel recently inked a deal with Missed Connection, and they’re now ready to reveal plans for their sophomore album.  Led by composer Tyler Belluz and lead singer Lisa Conway, the self-described ‘creepy’ Southern Ontario collective are returning after a hiatus that sent Conway overseas to pursue a degree. Back — and more educated than ever — the band will follow up 2011′s independently released Oneiric with Del Bel, due out on February 10 via Missed Connection. “

Read the whole piece HERE.

BRBR on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Ce maxi prépare habilement le terrain pour la sortie du nouvel album de The Weather Station. En attendant, il ne s’agit pas que d’une offrande complémentaire, mais d’un morceau à part entière parmi les offrandes racines canadiennes. L’approche réconfortante et aboutie de Tamara Lindeman mérite une écoute attentive, car elle offre un point de repère précieux parmi l’abondance des musiques folk au pays. The Weather Station prends assez de risques pour se livrer à la première personne, mais possède assez de confiance pour offrir une oeuvre universelle.”

Read the whole piece, en français, HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the !earshot charts this week:

Weekly Top 50 National Charts:
#19 – Legato Vipers – LV
#44 – Dean Drouillard - UFO Houses
#50 – Fossil Cliffs - Fossil Cliffs

Week End Wrap Up • 11.07.14

Nov7-2014

Nova Scotia Music Week showcasing artists Kim Harris, Carleton Stone, Adrian Morris, Adam Baldwin, and Like A Motorcycle paid a visit to Global Morning Halifax ahead of their festival appearances in Truro. See Kim’s interview & performance HERE, Carleton’s interview HERE, Adrian’s interview HERE, Adam’s interview HERE, and Like A Motorcycle’s interview & performance HERE.

The Truro Daily News features Kuato as part of their Nova Scotia Music Week coverage: “Kuato will be vying for Alternative Recording of the Year, Group Recording of the Year, Music Video of the Year, and Recording of the Year. They’ll also be performing at Champions Bar & Grill on Robie Street Saturday night. ‘I’m really looking forward to our show,’ said Toth. ‘It’s a great stage and there are some really heavy hitting bands – In-Flight Safety, Mardeen, Glory Glory, and Walrus.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The New Glasgow News talks to Kuato‘s bass player, Stephen MacDonald, about their Nova Scotia Music Week showcase: “When there’s a celebration of musical talent in the province, you don’t have to look hard to find a Pictou County native. Stellarton-born Stephen MacDonald, now a resident of Halifax, is the bassist for the band Kuato. The group is currently performing in Truro at Nova Scotia Music Week and MacDonald took a few questions about being a musician from Pictou County.”

Read the whole interview HERE.

Mixtape Magazine previews Nova Scotia Music Week: “Nova Scotia Music Week is a triple-headed creature featuring a festival with shows all over the host town, a conference with experts from all around the world covering all aspects of the music industry and an award show recognizing the accomplishments of members of the Nova Scotia music community. It has more of a conference/networking/party feel than something like Halifax Pop Explosion or SappyFest. This year the event takes place in the hub of Nova Scotia, Truro.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

BeatRoute on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Her new EP…is a delicate and prescient exhumation of what it means to fall in love. The record came together upon Lindeman realizing that she’d recorded bits and pieces in various locations over the last year that formed two triads of songs, with one side exploring the whirlwind that is falling in love and the other grappling with the self-doubt, confusion and cynicism that comes along with that.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

NOW Toronto on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Subtlety and calm are Weather Station mainstays, sometimes impeding momentum. Lindeman sings low much of the time, her lyrics coming out as hushed -confessionals and detailed observations against wafting slide guitar, brushed snare drum shuffles and acoustic guitar-picking. Midway through she explores her higher range, and that gives Seemed True (which features stunning fingerpicking and gorgeous harmonies) and Soft Spoken Man (with its surprising melodic twists) a welcome sense of liftoff.”

Read the whole review HERE.

PopMatters on Coyote‘s Proof Of Life: “‘Your House’ is interesting in that it has a ‘All My Friends’-style banging piano riff, complete with squiggly keyboards that you would ordinarily find on a Cars LP. It rises triumphantly, showcasing Coyote’s grasp of the anthemic. ‘Old News’ boasts a very ‘80s teen movie feel to it, and has a fluid groove that may get you tapping your foot to the beat. ‘Future Love’ offers a pulsating keyboard riff that transmutes into a funky rock ditty. Final song ‘Toothache’ is a slow and cold ballad, with stabby keyboards providing a counterpoint for a gently plucked acoustic guitar. Overall, the Proof of Life EP is strong stuff, and manages to sound somewhat original without breaking free of the groups that have inspired Coyote’s signature style.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! on the Tom Fun Orchestra‘s new video for “Earthworm Heart” : “Nature can be cruel, and the Tom Fun Orchestra’s video for ‘Earthworm Heart’ reminds us of that fact in rather fantastical fashion. The animated clip for this folk rock shanty begins quite cutely, as a cat goes fishing with a rod while wearing a yellow rain jacket. Things take a very creepy turn, however, as the kitty gets drunk on liquid catnip, is chased by ghostly worms, and ultimately gets gorily feasted upon by birds.”

Watch the video HERE.

Killer Baby Tomatoes on Force FieldsSubtle Hanky: “The reclusive, instrumental Fredericton-based Force Fields have a new 7-inch out now on Noyes Records and Backward Music. It’s their first release after playing together for nearly a decade, and all that alone time seems to have glued these guys together, sculpting precise grooves on the a-side ‘Subtle Hanky.’ The track is mostly taken up by a mathy crescendo, building its way back to the wall of sound it started with.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Exclaim! shares details of “New Life, the latest single from By Divine Right‘s upcoming tribute to Depeche Mode‘s Speak & Spell: “…the band have let loose an audio stream of them giving, ahem, new life to the synth-pop crew’s ‘New Life.’ More organic than its predecessor, the cover replaces vintage analogue synth-work with fuzz bass, live drums and the in-the-red danger of electric guitar. José Contreras likewise alters the arrangement by swapping Dave Gahan’s Brit accent out in favour of his own distortion-dusted vocals.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the !earshot charts this week:

Weekly Top 50 National Charts:
#24 – Legato Vipers – LV
#36 – Slow Leaves - Beauty Is So Common
#47 – Fossil Cliffs – Fossil Cliffs
Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Specialty Charts:
#9 – Christine Fellows – Burning Daylight

Week End Wrap Up • 10.31.14

Oct31-2014

If you’re a frequent visitor to our site, you know that on Fridays we take the time to put together an overview of coverage that comes our way for our clients. But every now and then we like to shine a light on the people who actually create this content. When it comes to arts reporting, you’ll be hard pressed to find someone as committed to the cause of covering the unsung heroes of independent music as Vish Khanna.

Vish is known as a contributor to Pitchfork, Exclaim!, and Signal to Noise, and also for his radio work as co-host of the Mich Vish Interracial Morning Show on CFRU in Guelph, ON and as host of The Breakfast Club on CBC Radio 3. In 2013, Vish launched his own podcast: Kreative Control. Now approaching its 150th episode, the show has featured interviews with international heavy hitters such as Ronnie Spector, Thurston Moore, “Weird Al” Yankovic, and Steve Albini, Canadian indie mainstays such as Joel Plaskett, Mac DeMarco, Basia Bulat, and Shad, all while maintaining a focus on talking to up and comers such as Monomyth, Esther Grey, and Ought. Vish has also featured a number of Pigeon Row clients over the past few years. That list is below.

Recently, Vish undertook a Patreon crowdfunding campaign to make Kreative Kontrol financially sustainable. Currently there is no revenue stream for this podcast: “I’ve been doing it for my own fulfillment and to contribute to culture but it’s time to see if I can generate some kind of salary from all this work,” Vish wrote on his website last week. We here at Pigeon Row HQ are constant supporters of Vish’s work and big fans of his podcast. If you are too, or if you’re simply interested in supporting independent Canadian arts-driven media, please consider pledging a monthly amount to the show.

EP. #19Ian F. Svenonius
EP. #41Mike O’Neill
EP. #70Joel RL Phelps
EP. #72Marie LeBlanc Flanagan of Weird Canada
EP. #101Steven Lambke of Baby Eagle and Constantines
EP. #103Culture Reject
EP. #115Jeremy Gara & Samir Khan of Kepler
EP. #119Constantines
EP. #132Christine Fellows
EP. #142Ryan Hemsworth & BADBADNOTGOOD live at the Halifax Pop Explosion

And now on to our regularly scheduled programming:

AUX on Halifax Pop Explosion: “The music community’s dedication is seen in its ongoing battle to save the Khyber (and in setting up a new, if not much smaller, space in the North End, where Weird Canada held a HPX gathering to talk about issues exactly such as venue accessibility and arts initiatives and funding in Canada). You feel it when you squeeze yourself into CKDU’s tiny lobby for sets from Old and Weird and Soft Spot. And you’re encouraged to take it all in when the furthest distance between venues is a 10-15 minute walk—many of those walks very likely up Citadel Hill—and a scenic one at that. The way Halifax Pop is ultimately structured around supporting its own local scene—while bringing international heavyweights such as Danny Brown, Against Me!, and Zeds Dead in for the week too—is obvious, and infectious.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Exclaim! on Danny Brown at the Halifax Pop Explosion: “On songs from his XXX mixtape, like ‘I Will,’ he threw the mic to the audience to test the extent to which his choppy bars have been heard and memorized. The crowd replied as best it could, but there was more reaction to ‘Grown Up’ and tracks from Old, especially ’25 Bucks’ featuring Purity Ring. The mere physical presence of an artist is rarely enough to carry a show, but Brown is one of the strongest solo figures in contemporary hip-hop and, as a result, he gave the best performance of the festival.”

Read the whole review HERE.

For a full list of Exclaim!’s HPX 2014 coverage, click HERE.

The Coast on Ghostface Killah and Raekwon at the Halifax Pop Explosion: “I happened to be standing in a small pocket of very small Wu-Tang superfans who completely lost their minds for the duration of the concert, which increased my own enjoyment drastically. That’s not to say the show wasn’t major, there was so much more energy from Ghostface compared to his last Halifax date in April. Starting the set with ‘I Can’t Go To Sleep,’ Raekwon and Ghostface were in good spirits, clearly full of love (or something) and funny banter.”

Read the whole review HERE.

For a full list of The Coast’s HPX 2014 coverage, click HERE.

CBC Music on Tanya Tagaq at the Halifax Pop Explosion: “Anyone who was expecting a run through of Tagaq’s Polaris Prize winning Animism on Saturday night would have been temporarily disappointed. Tagaq opted to do an entirely improvised set, instead. Working with a drummer and guitarist, Tagaq created a performance that was totally captivating. The juxtaposition of the guttural, primal throat singing — which Tagaq explained is meant to recreate the sound of the Northern landscape and the animals that live on it — and Tagaq’s haunting soprano singing voice was breathtaking. Watching her throw herself around the stage while singing, non-stop, for the better part of an hour was like going on a mental journey. When she stopped, there was 20 full seconds of silence while the audience recovered and processed what they’d seen. It was brilliant.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Ears and Eyes Online on Alanna Gurr and the Greatest State‘s Late At Night: “What her band…brings to her songs is an elegant, uncluttered ensemble sound, one that doesn’t distinguish itself through brute force or virtuoso playing. Instead, they deliver a professional, traditional style of accompaniment that discretely frames Gurr’s folksy vocal sound and earnest songwriting style. The result is something purer than alt-country; the kind of deep- roots authenticity indie music lovers long for these days. Gurr’s songs speak of painful separation and heartfelt attachment.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Argue Job on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “[Tamara] Lindeman writes with a casual openness, a comfortable intimacy. ‘What am I going to do with everything I know?’ she asks. The firmness of her intonation here is a sharp contrast to the whispered tailings of her singing, the plaintive moan of steel strings longing for simplicity. Even as we tip on this fulcrum we are still more dream than reality. This is a record to savour and to internalize: stare into its surface until you recognize a reflection.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Aquinian features Dan MacCormack and his new album Symphony of Ghosts: “MacCormack said he was able to relate to the characters and settings in the books because of where he’s from in Cape Breton, in a small industrial town like those mentioned in many of the books. ‘The way people deal with things emotionally, things like tragedy and globalization, are pretty common things in the Maritimes and especially small communities in the Maritimes,’ said MacCormack. The songs tell a range of stories from a logging community to a father-daughter relationship. MacCormack says he didn’t want to leave any ground uncovered. ‘For me, this was a labour of love. I wanted to take my time, I wanted to do a good job, not superficially use the works, so for each song I developed a unique concept.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the !earshot charts this week:

Weekly Top 50 National Charts:
#11 – Legato Vipers – LV
Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Specialty Charts:
#6 – Slow Leaves – Beauty Is So Common

Week End Wrap Up • 10.24.14

Oct24-2014

Metro Halifax features the Halifax Pop Explosion: “Mark Grundy, one of a trio who make up the experimental-pop ‘baby jazz’ Heaven for Real and play a free show at Gus’ Pub Saturday, said he’s been in the festival with various bands for a long time but over the last three or four years HPX seems to “be hitting a really nice stride” by using week-long bracelets and becoming more accessible. ‘It’s good for the city,’ Grundy said. ‘They cover some ground considerably.’”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Halifax Pop Explosion Executive Director James Boyle, and artists Vogue Dots and Ryan Hemsworth stopped by Global Morning Halifax to talk about this year’s festival. Watch the interview with James HERE, Vogue Dots HERE, and Hemsworth HERE.

Halifax Pop Explosion showcasing artists Kim Harris and Coyote paid a visit to CTV Atlantic ahead of their festival appearances. See Kim’s performance HERE and Coyote’s performance HERE.

CBC Music compiles a (mini) oral history of the Pop Explosion‘s best moments: “We’ve asked 20 musicians, writers, organizers and publicists — who’ve known the fest for years — for their most memorable HPX moment, from that 2004 Arcade Fire show that people are still talking about to the time Rich Aucoin played We’re All Dying to Live in sequence and had 80 people onstage in a church. They’ve also chosen a must-hear track from bands playing this year, to aid with your show-going indecisiveness.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Exclaim! reviews shows by Austra, Single Mothers, Kuato, Solids, Lights, Tokyo Police Club, and TEEN at the Halifax Pop Explosion. For complete Exclaim! HPX coverage, click HERE.

The Chronicle Herald features Against Me! ahead of their sold-out Halifax Pop Explosion show: “Against Me! has taken control of its own destiny as well, leaving major label Sire Records after its 2010 album White Crosses for the artistic freedom of its own imprint Total Treble Music. The change is reflected in the buzz-saw ferocity of Transgender Dysphoria Blues. Grace’s clear, powerful voice is still firmly in place, and in her role as producer she’s managed to distill the band’s most exciting elements in a connected sequence of ripped-from-real-life songs.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Coast features Ryan Hemsworth in their Halifax Pop Explosion cover story: “Though most articles mention that he’s from Halifax—it’s easy to romanticize the idea of a world-famous producer and DJ getting his start in some wind-swept shanty on the coast of the Atlantic— Hemsworth moved to Toronto and has expressed that Halifax isn’t the most welcoming place for electronic musicians, something any struggling local would agree with. ‘I’ve tried to figure it out, I’ve never felt like people were turning their back on me, but there’s always been a stronger connection to bands and folk in our culture, it’s Maritime-ish,’ he says. ‘It’s such good fodder for writers—I’m either from Halifax or from the internet. Either way, it doesn’t really matter geographically, all of our shit ends up on the internet.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Coast also featured lots of other Halifax Pop Explosion artists including City Natives, Teenage Kicks, Strange Attractor, Astral Swans, Mo Kenney, Tanya Tagaq, Mozart’s Sister, Gianna Lauren, Freelove Fenner, Against Me!, Sandi Rankaduwa, Jay Mayne & Thrillah Kane, Cam Smith, and Rich Aucoin. For complete HPX coverage from The Coast, click HERE.

Noisey features Vogue Dots and their new album, Mauka: “When listening to Mauka you can’t help but envision yourself on a sailboat at night, drinking whisky and pomegranate juice, playing a game of Kill-Fuck-Marry before taking off all your clothes and diving into the ocean. So, if that sounds as paradisiacal to you, there’s no doubt you’ll be spilling liquor and getting down to your skivvies to the sounds of Mauka on an imaginary schooner in no time…It’s not risky to prophesize the impending blowup of these guys.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Quick Before It Melts on Vogue Dots’ “Way With Silence” : “Halifax NS-based electro-soul-pop duo Vogue Dots unveiled their latest single, the quivering, shiver-inducing ‘Way With Silence’ a few weeks back, and it is an intense trip. ‘Way With Silence’ comes from their second EP, Mauka, out today on Montreal’s Indica Records.”

Read the whole preview HERE.

Pop Matters on Vogue Dots‘ Mauka: “Their Mauka EP is their second extended play of the year, and the group makes shimmery, dark, foreboding synth music with guitars that sound a bit akin to Beach House – if Beach House managed to be on antidepressants…They have a distinguishable sound that brands them, with cooing female vocals and spiky guitars rubbing up against icy cold synth lines. All in all, Mauka is a work of art, one that makes you wonder how the band can stretch things further on a proper LP. It’s an appreciable appetizer for bigger and better things, and this group definitely shows that it is in vogue with the times, making an arresting brand of glitchy music.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Canadian Music Blog on Vogue Dots‘ Mauka: “Self-described as performing experimental pop, the sound is melancholy, melodic electronica with deep moods and dark ambiance. The pair has released 4-track EP Mauka, a strong followup from last offering Toska, released earlier this year. The new record is tighly structured with solid composition, and when Babette’s vocals smack the synth chill, the sonic landscape fills with frozen honey.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Music Blogged on Vogue Dots‘ Mauka: “Echoing Beach House and Purity Ring with just a touch of 90’s pop, it is a dreamy blend of shoe gaze electronic music Halifax. Mauka is the follow up to Toska (released May 2014) and may be short, but as always with Vogue Dots, it is quality over quantity, that gives quite the punch to the duos sound. Recording the initials stages of their release at Brooklyn Based Cascine Records (Pigeons and Planes, Wildarms, Southern Shores etc.) and adding the final touches at Sonic Temple and Echo Chamber in Halifax, the duo have quickly made ripples in Canada’s East Coast Music scene.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Southern Souls on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Lindeman’s voice feels a little richer and her narratives prove more idiosyncratic; in this way, the songs onWhat Am I Going To Do have more to offer, though they never do so outright. Lindeman unfurls her stories with great modesty bolstered by instantly memorable melodies. The morals here appear in minute details. Many of the songs revolve around absences: of words, of vessels, of understanding, of places to call home. What Am I Going To Do represents an intoxicating development, the sound of Lindeman coming carefully into her own and balancing, steady-footed, at new heights. With a full-length slated for 2015, this EP functions expertly as a teaser of the great things to come from one of Canada’s finest folk performers.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Make A Little Noise on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “It’s a lovely little six-song collection of delicate folk tunes, falling somewhere on the energy scale between Nick Drake and soft Joni Mitchell. That is to say, it’s exceptionally low energy. That also means, though, it’s exceptionally relaxing, and one of those records that sounds exactly like the season it’s released in. What Am I Going To Do… is a proper soundtrack to the world slowing down in the fall, anticipating its eventual halt.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The News Record features The Weather Station: “At 17 minutes, the newest six-song album from The Weather Station is brief, like a rainy front moving across the listener’s mind. The Canadian band’s new album, “What Am I Going to Do Now with Everything I Know,” is a folky EP comprised of the sounds of shimmering pedal steel guitar, soft brushes on snare, fingerpicked acoustic guitar and the voice of Tamara Lindeman. Her voice is the catalyst of the album, and recounts pain and beauty with aching restraint in semi-whispers and a range comparable to Joni Mitchell circa her ‘Blue’ era.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

The Record features Legato Vipers: “To go along with their throwback sound, the band also sells some ’50s and ’60s-inspired merchandise such as switchblade combs, flasks and now leather jackets at their live shows, something that came from the inside joke origins of the band, Brooks said. ‘Initially it was really Tyler and I just writing minute-long songs to try and make one another laugh over email and then, you know, ‘Well, why don’t we buy matching leather jackets, why don’t we come up with a funny name, why don’t we come out with funny merch,” he recalled.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

A Music Blog, Yea? premieres Coyote‘s “Proof of Life” video: “The EP is packed with jubilant pop songs, lively hooks, and contagious dance-rock grooves. To accompany its release, Coyote created a fun video documenting their lives on the road for the EP’s title track “Proof of Life” — seeing a band in their natural element, touring, can’t help but make a music lover smile. ”

Watch the video HERE.

Ears and Eyes on Dean Drouillard‘s UFO Houses: “Giving us a taste of what is to come, opening track ‘Return To The Start’ burst at the seams with 60′s and 70′s influenced surf rock haziness. Classic reverb-tinged electric guitar takes lead over a cinematic escapade of instrumental guitar-rock nostalgia. From bubbling bass lines to spacey drum rolls similar to that of Pink Floyd’s ‘Great Gig In The Sky,’ Drouillard is exploring these boundaries just as much as he is determining them. Whether you decide to call it psychedelic-snuggle-pop, or even fuzzed-out-wake-up-rock, it’s a record that will keep you warm during the coming winter months.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Prairie Dog Magazine on Community Theatre‘s Northern Register: “Cramming everyone together like that has its risks. The album can be gloriously eclectic, or it can sound disjointed. The playing can be spontaneous and beautifully shambolic, or just sloppy. Northern Register gets it right. The artists, including members of Baby Eagle, Construction and Deconstruction and Marine Dreams, are diverse, but united by a shared aesthetic. Plus, there’s the joy of disparate elements mixing together –– Mathias of the Burning Hell’s deep vocals in the background of Wax Mannequin’s track, for instance, or Shotgun Jimmie lightening the mood while Michael Feuerstack brings it down.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Rock Freaks on Kuato‘s The Great Upheaval: “Starting with slow, layered guitars, the first song ‘New Home’ slowly builds the album into existence, and while the pace of the album never picks up to anything completely explosive, the songs grow louder and more ambitious until they culminate in the dramatic title track, ‘The Great Upheaval,’ which ends the album. The compositions that worked out the best for me when I first started listening were for some reason also the longest ones. I’m thinking mainly of ‘Groundwork’ and ‘Black Horizon’ that both build up their respective moods fairly well. The first and best of them, spanning almost nine minutes, sounds almost majestic due to its slowly progressing riffs. It travels from an all-embracing melancholy to a somewhat more energetically optimistic feel as the pace picks up and the soundscape is filled with delicate guitars on top of some pretty noisy drums.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Top 50 National Charts:
#21 – Legato Vipers – LV

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Specialty Charts:
#2
 – Slow Leaves – Beauty Is So Common 

Week End Wrap Up • 10.17.14

Oct17-2014

Pitchfork on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “…these short and intertwined tunes portray the stepwise process into love. They seem, however, written and played from a distance, so that the butterflies and doubts have settled into a graceful, logical arc. Lindeman’s voice flits and cracks, peaks and valleys, comforts and cries, not unlike that of Joni Mitchell. But she possesses the unwavering patience of Bill Callahan’s later records, delivering every word and worry like she’s pondered it all into acceptance.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

PopMatters on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Toronto’s Tamara Lindeman records as the Weather Station and her latest EP, What Am I Going to Do With Everything I Know is a statement, not a question. Compared with a feminine version of Sun Kil Moon, but sounding a whole lot like early Joni Mitchell, just without the flutter in her voice, the songs on the EP are lush and quiet. You get just Lindeman’s voice, her acoustic guitar, an occasional pedal steel guitar or background vocal, and perhaps a lightly brushed drum every now and again. What Am I Going to Do With Everything I Know doesn’t profess to have answers, but it is an on-point declaration from a potent and vital Canadian folk talent.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Verb on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Constructed around an acoustic guitar and her gossamer voice, What Am I Going To Do is short on hooks and long on lyrics…Once again, Lindeman dives into our tendency to ascribe meaning to things that seem to mean nothing. What Am I Going To Do offers few clear answers: she doesn’t know; nobody does. Even the most tantalizing hints — ‘It all becomes true if we say so’ — leave the record where it started, beautifully-wrought and spinning in an uncertain wind.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Grayowl Point on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “The meditative spirit of Tamara Lindeman (The Weather Station) and subsequently her keen attention to detail as found in her lyrics is entrancing. With so many strong folk voices in Canada right now, it’s too much to say that Lindeman is the only one keeping folk music alive in this country but it feels too little to say that she is, simply, a great addition to this circle of folksters. Lindeman is a force.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Sunken Sounds premieres the new EP from Vogue Dots, Mauka: “The upcoming release is truly a beautiful and highly progressive piece of work. During my first listen through Mauka I was honestly brought to tears at one point. The lyrics featured hold a great amount of depth and honesty that really just hit at home. Their dreamlike soundscapes though were able to quickly bring me back to comfort. The duo seamlessly web together an immense amount of emotions throughout each single one of the recordings.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Silent Shout on Vogue Dots“Way With Silence” : “So Vogue Dots keep getting better and better…So it’s no surprise that their latest, the lead single from their forthcoming Mauka EP is another extremely accomplished anthemic atmospheric electropop gem. With an incredibly evil arpeggiated coda. Dropped jaws over here!”

Read the whole review HERE.

Nexus Newspaper on Dan MacCormack‘s Symphony of Ghosts: “MacCormack emits a deep connection to Richards’ novels and translates their ideas from text to song. The first song, ‘Face Your Hunters,’ is powerful, starting off with the heartbeat-like rhythm of a drum (think tribal), featuring layered vocals and haunting lyrics. The remainder of Symphony of Ghosts is incredibly diverse, showcasing MacCormack’s talent as a multi-instrumentalist.”

Read the whole review HERE.

New Canadian Music on Dan MacCormack‘s Symphony of Ghosts: “The poetic title Symphony Of Ghosts is an apt hint at the literary bent of this lovely new debut album from Halifax-based songsmith Dan MacCormack (formerly in Grassmarket). It is inspired by the writing of famed Canadian novelist David Adams Richards, with each of the ten songs focused on a different Richards’ novel. The musical setting is Canadiana folk enriched with inventive arrangements and instrumentation (some top local players are featured) and the fine production of Jason Michael MacIsaac (Heavy Blinkers, Jenn Grant).”

Read the whole review HERE.

Killer Baby Tomatoes on Legato VipersLV: “Need some more surf in your life? Guelph four-piece Legato Vipers work through ’60s rock & roll rhythms and a bit of soul, but let the guitar do the talking. The slide can be chaotic on ‘Angel Dust’ or soft on ‘Sweet 16,’ and the lead gets more sentimental on ‘Bernie (Ernie McInerney).’ There’s a bit of a menacing tone (when you’re not getting The Good, the Bad and the Ugly vibes) throughout the record, but things get darkest with album-closer ‘Chocolate Milkshake.’ It’s probably the most evil chocolate milkshake you’ll ever hear.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! on Cam Smith‘s Cannon: “Plenty of MCs are torn between dance floors and street corners, but Haligonian rapper Cam Smith is one of the few willing to ponder that dilemma on wax. Over the trembling 808s of ‘The Son Or The Fall,’ the opening track on his new self-produced LP Cannon, he unspools deeply moving rhymes about street violence and friends that ‘heaven swallowed’” Then comes his biggest lament — that fans demand anything but therapeutic introspection.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Ears and Eyes Online on Community Theatre‘s Northern Register: “It’s a triumphant statement in collaborative music. It’s something that grabs you, takes your lunch money, and then takes you to a small cabin in the Yukon. The very one that these songs were pieced together in possibly. From a feeling of nautical adventure and boyish wonder on ‘The Quickening’ to the somehow similar feeling of drinking beers in your garage on ‘Snailhouse.’ This album wants to take you places and I hope you let it.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Coast previews the first few days of the Halifax Pop Explosion: “First of all, are you well-hydrated? Sufficiently rested? Do you have a good base going? Anything less than that signals peril, young HPX learner. The storied festival kicks off this Tuesday, and there’s still a lot of music-listening to be done before next Thursday’s HPX issue. Get a leg up on the pile and dive into a mid-week helping of Pop.”

Read the overview HERE, and check out their features on Mo Kenney, Astral Swans, Strange AttractorTeenage Kicks, and City Natives.

NOW Toronto on Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “…’Second Chances,’ the mellow title track of Slow Leaves’ 2013 EP, reprised here with Davidson’s Doug Paisley-like tenor backed by a Bandesque bass line, acoustic guitar and organ. Or the moonlit late-night-drive closer, ‘Rearview,’ with tinkling piano, harmonica and faraway ‘shoo-be-doops.’ On ‘Nostalgia,’ Davidson draws inspiration from Neil Young’s ‘Out On The Weekend.’ Elsewhere there’s a bit of boogie woogie (‘Life Of A Better Man’), and ‘Country Of Ideas’ bubbles with funky country rock.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! on Dean Drouillard‘s UFO Houses: “The album is entirely instrumental, and a press release points to sonic touchstones like George Harrison, Nils Cline, Ennio Morricone, Robert Fripp, Nick Drake and Jonny Greenwood. The nine tracks are said to be ‘hazy, dramatic vignettes,’ and the album was was recorded in a Toronto loft with producer Joshua Van Tassel (of Great Lake Swimmers), who also plays drums.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Charts:
#34 – Legato Vipers – LV
#44 – Coyote – Proof of Life

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Specialty Charts:
#2
 – Slow Leaves – Beauty Is So Common

Week End Wrap Up • 10.10.14

Oct10-2014

BeatRoute features The Constantines: “Unless you’ve been hiding out in some desolate cave for the past year, you’re probably aware that one of Canada’s most blistering and brilliant indie rock bands, the Constantines, have reunited to bring their fierce, fiery and frenetic live show to all of you unwashed masses once more. Celebrating the somewhat unorthodox 11th anniversary of their seminal album, Shine a Light, these belligerent boys are back together after a good four years of a sort-of-breakup-sort-of-hiatus and are more insane, energetic and excited than ever.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Vue Weekly features The Constantines: “If Webb reckons that the band was somewhat disconnected from its own music that doesn’t hold true for the fans. The band’s legend only grew in its time away, with old fans holding fast to their discography, and new fans joining on despite never seeing the group. ‘It was definitely surprising to see that people were still seeking us out after we stopped playing,’ says Webb.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Vancouver Sun features The Constantines: “Four years ago, [Steve] Lambke wasn’t sure the band’s route would even continue. After more than a decade together, frontman Bry Webb needed time away from the Cons, so they announced a hiatus with no firm plan to reunite. In the end, all five members worked on separate projects — Lambke, Webb and keyboardist Will Kidman each released solo albums, while drummer Doug MacGregor and bassist Dallas Wehrle joined other bands. The Cons also kicked around various reunion offers, but Lambke says the timing was either off or the schemes ‘didn’t feel right’ — until the fivesome decided to release and tour around the 11th anniversary edition of Shine A Light.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

The Toronto Star on The Constantines: “This gig was a joyous, fist-pumping shout-along from start to finish, and the band rose to the occasion by playing every bit as hard as they did as preternaturally talented youngsters 15 years ago…The Constantines remain one of the tautest, most disciplined and most explosive live acts ever to strut the stage. In a parallel universe, maybe they became the next Tragically Hip.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! on The Constantines: “Exhausting all of their hits early on in the evening clearly paved the way during the encore for a few deeper cuts, and the Cons did not disappoint. ‘Little Instruments’ and the downtempo ‘Lizaveta’ made appearances, as did low-key number ‘Hyacinth Blues,’ but the band saved perhaps the best for last with a cover of Lou Reed’s ‘Temporary Thing.’ It was a subtle reminder that although the band are back together, moments like these are ultimately fleeting. One thing will always be certain, though: the Constantines are one of the most consistent Canadian rock bands of all time.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Gorilla vs. Bear premieres “Way With Silence, the new single from Vogue Dots: “‘Way With Silence’ is the dreamily downcast new single from Canadian experimental pop duo Vogue Dots, taken from the group’s stellar new Mauka EP… Almost feels like a throbbing, significantly more danceable Beach House jam, until the duo takes a darker and more intense turn near the end.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Killer Baby Tomatoes previews “Way With Silence by Vogue Dots: “‘Way With Silence’ from New Brunswick-based synth-pop duo Vogue Dots moves along at a dreamy, dancey pace until the low end shows up for a minute of darkness.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Ride The Tempo on “Way With Silence” by Vogue Dots: “Vogue Dots just get better and better. The new single ‘Way With Silence’ is dark, evocative electro pop that pulls you in and won’t let you go. Not that you’ll want to be freed. Resistance is futile.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Silver Soundz on “Way With Silence” by Vogue Dots: “‘Way With Silence’ is the chilling new single from Canadian experimental/electronic-pop duo Vogue Dots. ‘Way With Silence’ stays true to the group’s devotion to the darker side of electronic music. The lush vocals meet electronically crafted melodies to create a dreamy darkness with a heavy bass undertone.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Faded Arrow on “Way With Silence” by Vogue Dots: “The gloomy first single from Mauka, ‘Way With Silence,’ establishes a thick and murky atmosphere on the opening beat, like a dark cloud lingering in your speakers. The song finally awakens near the end, unleashing a wave of chilling, devastating emotion.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

New Canadian Music on Fossil Cliffs: “There are some real interesting underground rock outfits emerging from the East Coast. To that list add Fossil Cliffs, a new solo project from Mike D’Eon, of the excellent Kuato…There’s a nice diversity in the material, from the stoner rock feel of ‘In My Eyes’ to the hypnotic ‘Wake Me Up.’ Trivia note: did you know there are actual physical Fossil Cliffs in Nova Scotia? This rock equivalent is equally impressive.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Ride The Tempo on Fossil Cliffs: “There’s math rock (‘Summer Sun’), downbeat indie folk rock (‘In My Eyes’) and a touch of ’90’s slacker alt pop (‘Wake Me Up’). ‘Cold’ is one of those odd, off-kilter folk numbers that you’d expect from Beck, and ‘Down and Out’ is like a cross between Fleet Foxes and Neil Young.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Scene Magazine on Fossil Cliffs: “Fossil Cliffs is a departure from the usually melodic slow-burn that is Kuato, where he plucks the strings. With Cliffs, D’Eon goes for the grizzled sludge rock/garage rock sound that you’ll recognize from jam sessions in your mom’s basement. Its dirty, its cool, its new tunes.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

New Canadian Music on LV, the new full-length from Legato Vipers: “There’s something timelessly appealing about the sound of a guitar-driven surf instrumental rock band, and that is reaffirmed by LV, the debut full-length album from Legato Vipers. There’s a pleasing sting to the sound of these Vipers, and if Tarantino is looking for new soundtrack material, he should check them out.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Grayowl Point on Legato VipersLV: “Whoever’s idea it was to say “Hey, the world needs an instrumental surf-rock band” deserves some credit for bringing Legato Vipers into existence. It’s hard to pinpoint exactly what makes this band so appealing—but it’s most likely the commitment to no frills and no bullshit, just a bunch of less-than-three-minute-long blasts of rock and roll.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Junnnktank on Cam Smith‘s Cannon: “Look, if you haven’t been paying attention to Cam before, his production or even his crazy videos like ‘Turbo’ and ‘Mad Crack,’ his album Cannon is sure to bring you in…Cam is here and he’s going to make damn sure we all take notice. We’ve taken notice.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Cam Smith stops by Global Morning Halifax to talk Cannon, Nova Scotia Music Week and Reebok. Check it out below.

The Cadre on Coyote‘s Proof of Life: “Proof of Life features six tracks that flow nicely, which makes the album great background music when writing papers or taking notes. The album is upbeat, catchy, and is full of youth and longing. The EP is quite unique when compared to many local indie bands…Coyote sounds like an indie band from America, rather than one from rural PEI.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Canuckistan Music on Coyote‘s Proof of Life: “…they peddle a sort of bubbly, guitar-driven pop sound that has one foot in the now and the other in the eighties, most notably those anthemic sing-alongs that Echo and the Bunnymen or U2 did so well…Those ought to keep the kids dancing, but for my money the cutesy ‘Old News’ is exactly that, a bouncy throwback to the best of the MTV years, a guilty pleasure that, windows closed and curtains drawn, we can all have some fun with.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Uniter on Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “…the pop sensibilities on ‘Life of a Better Man’ and Nick Drake-y opener ‘Everybody Wants to Be in Love’ are quite bright. ‘Dreamer’ is waiting to be placed on that mix for your new crush, while the twangy ‘Neighbourhood Watch’ is a gunslinger’s delight. ‘Institution’ might be the standout here, a subtle little dreamer that’s catchy without being intrusive. A solid, crisp disc that will likely take Davidson to the next level.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Reflector on Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “With Davidson’s poetic melodies and Matyas’ pop harmonic arrangement, this album is the perfect playlist for those late night study sessions. The first track of the album, ‘Everybody Wants to be in Love’ is nothing but pure honesty, with piano and guitar creating the perfect melody for the poetic lyrics…Beauty is so Common is a perfect showcase of Canadian talent. The album is definitely worth checking out.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The International Americana Music Show features Graham Nicholas and Bend The River on this week’s episode. Take a listen HERE.

Graham Nicholas stops by CP24 for a performance and a chat about his new album Sometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers. Watch the piece HERE.

Argue Job on Graham NicholasSometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers: “Nicholas’ characters are on full display here. His lyrics are a surgeon’s scalpel, spreading open the motivations and fears of his characters with a challenging clarity. Even when his tracks acquire an upbeat drive, as in “Sunday Kinda Love,” even then the song’s sense of humour and unabashed eroticism displays the honesty and intimacy of Nicholas’ songwriting…How welcome it is to find a folk singer with a talent for balancing clear songwriting and the need for pace and variety.”

Read the whole review HERE.

New Canadian Music on VKNGS: “The sound of hard-edged Haligonians VKNGS has been described as “post-hardcore.” The group features ex-members of bands such as North of America, The Holy Shroud, Union of the Snake, Jimmy Swift Band, Adrenaline, and Jon McKiel, and their unrelenting aural onslaught is an impressive one.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Grayowl Point on Community Theatre‘s Northern Register: “Where the album really shines is when this community atmosphere is the most obvious. In a clear nod to their Northern surroundings, the choir-like sounds of ‘Onward and Upward’ really give you the sense of how fun a project this really is. In a hearty ode to the majestical Aurora Borealis, the line ‘Aurora Borealis, the nighttime is your palace’ has to be my favourite, the gang of musicians show off their talented vocal chops for a harmonized treat.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Noisey includes AA Wallace‘s video for “Lipstick & Stethoscopes” in this list of Top 50 Music Videos Funded by the Government of Canada: “Bathed in Stereoscopic vision the video is the most effective direct-to-DVD sequel of BeeGee’s ‘Night Fever I’ve ever seen but with more golden glow filters and prisms. However, the video still works swell.”

See the whole list HERE.

The New Brunswick Beacon on the economic impacts of the Halifax Pop Explosion: “The Halifax Pop Explosion brings 30,000 attendees and $4.5 million back into the Nova Scotia’s capital, but its role of leader among the music festivals is felt outside the region. ‘We want to be a good community player, and for us it means that the community goes beyond Halifax,’ says festival executive director James Boyle.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Yukon Radio Dave catches up with Christine Fellows to chat about her new album/book of poetry Burning Daylight. Listen to the interview HERE.

Ride The Tempo on Dan MacCormack‘s Symphony of Ghosts: “Halifax’s Dan MacCormack’s third album is an endearing homage to the works of David Adams Richards, with each song based on one of the author’s novels. MacCormack’s rootsy folk approach is a good match to the subject matter and comes off as a fine ode of its own to the often harsh life in rural New Brunswick and its snow, snow, snow.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Charts:
#31 – Christine Fellows – Burning Daylight

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Specialty Charts:
#1
 – Slow Leaves – Beauty Is So Common
#5 - Christine Fellows - Burning Daylight