Week-End Wrap Up • 04.11.14

Feb21-2014

The Chronicle Herald on Eastlink East Coast Music Week and the East Coast Music Awards: “Nova Scotian artists won’t be coming home across Confederation Bridge empty handed today after a weekend of East Coast Music Awards presentations in Charlottetown.Performers from this province cleaned up in the final round, at the Eastlink ECMA Gala at the P.E.I. Convention Centre on Sunday night, wrapping up a tune-filled East Coast Music Week in the island’s capital. The bard of Pictou County, Dave Gunning, was Sunday night’s major winner, taking home a pair of ECMAs for his latest CD No More Pennies. The album was named solo recording of the year, while his song ‘These Hands,’ composed with friend and Canadian country star George Canyon, earned him a songwriter of the year award.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

CBC on Eastlink East Coast Music Week and the East Coast Music Awards: “Folk singer Dave Gunning of Pictou, N.S., walked away with two major East Coast Music Awards Sunday night at the P.E.I. Convention Centre in Charlottetown. Gunning was first presented with songwriter of the year for These Hands, which was also last year’s ECMA song of the year. In accepting the award, Gunning gave a shout-out to the song’s co-writer, George Canyon, and to his children and wife Sara. ‘I want to put a plea out to the ECMAs that they should have a spouse of the year award. Really. Why not?’ he said. P.E.I. Olympic gold medallist, Heather Moyse later handed Gunning his second award — solo recording of the year for his tenth album No More Pennies.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Cape Breton Post on Eastlink East Coast Music Week and the East Coast Music Awards: “Cape Breton bands had a big night at East Coast Music Week’s signature gala event, taking home three of the most sought-after awards.The Town Heroes, featuring Mike Ryan, of Inverness, and Bruce Gillis, of Mabou, won fan’s choice video of the year for ‘New York City’ Sunday night , after claiming rising star recording of the year honours for Sunday Movies, earlier in the week. The Barra MacNeils were named fan’s choice entertainer of the year, and Mary Jane Lamond and Wendy MacIsaac’s album Seinn earned group recording of the year, at the awards gala held at the P.E.I. Convention Centre in Charlottetown, Sunday.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

La Voix Acadienne on Eastlink East Coast Music Week and the East Coast Music Awards: “La journée du samedi 5 avril, les activités en français ont duré une bonne partie de la journée, à partir de l’heure du brunch le matin jusque tard en soirée, pour la vitrine officielle francophone Franco Est.  «Cette vitrine n’est pas juste une obligation pour les ECMA, c’est aussi un véritable tremplin pour nos artistes.  Il y a des acheteurs de spectacles de partout qui y assistent, et cela peut se traduire par des débouchés intéressants pour les artistes», dit Ghislaine Cormier.”

Read the whole feature, en français, HERE.

The Guardian on Eastlink East Coast Music Week and the East Coast Music Awards: “The Cradle of Confederation received hundreds of delegates as well as visitors from across Canada, the U.S. and beyond who attended the various music stages, dined in P.E.I. restaurants and stayed in P.E.I. accommodations during the festival/trade show. In turn, the artists enjoyed Island hospitality. ‘I think Charlottetown has done a really, really fantastic job of hosting the ECMAs. Everyone is so friendly here. I even had people come up and offer to pay my parking mete. After living in large cities it’s something I really appreciate,’ says Cape Breton’s Mary Jane Lamond who, with Wendy MacIsaac, picked up group recording of the year award.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

CTV Atlantic features Eastlink East Coast Music Week and the East Coast Music Awards. Watch the piece HERE.

The Coast features Glory Glory and their new EP So Long: “Glory Glory has been together since 2006, so it makes sense that there would be some peaks and valleys. Thankfully, So Long wasn’t marking the end of the band, but instead a shift to a new sound. As they say, band that evolves together stays together (they say that, right?). Glory Glory wrapped up recording with Ed Renzi, and tossed around the idea of hiring a high-profile mixer, landing on Justin Gerrish from Vampire Weekend and The Strokes. ‘We’d been wondering for a while if we would really hear the difference if we hired someone with Justin’s profile to do it,” says Warren. “When he responded saying he thought the music was rad, that he would do it, and we could even afford to work with him we were all ‘AMAZE,’ if you know what I mean.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Music Nerd on Glory Glory‘s So Long: “When it comes to being an independent band, you have to seize every available opportunity to work on your craft and the promotion machine behind it. For Glory Glory guitarist and vocalist Adam Warren, this means silk-screening band posters during his child’s nap-time. Not that he minds, however because the truth is, the Halifax band has much going for them. This past Tuesday, the group released So Long, a three-song EP that sees the group diversifying their sound to incorporate new wave, indie music along a heavy reliance upon syncopated dance rhythms.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Pennyblackmusic on Carleton Stone‘s Draws Blood: “Sporting Influences such as Ryan Adams, Bruce Springsteen, the Hold Steady, Gordie Sampson, and Hawksley Workman, Carleton Stone is a charismatic performer and soulful songwriter hailing from Cape Breton. ‘Cape Breton?’ I hear you ask. Somewhere in the bleak and cold wilds of Nova Scotia. The sort of place where your fingers go numb if you leave them out of your mittens for more than three seconds. Fortunately Carleton’s music is on a much warmer plane than his hometown. His self-titled debut album was produced by the Juno Award-winning Workman and the new album sparkles with smart, pop-country energy, clever hooks and an infectious exuberance.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Cape Breton Post features Carleton Stone and his new album Draws Blood: “The title track ‘Draws Blood’ is co-written by Stone and [Jay] Smith, and the album also features a second Stone-Smith co-write, ‘Like a Knife,’ as well as eight other tracks that Stone co-wrote with a number of friends and collaborators including Dylan Guthro, Mo Kenney, Steve MacDougall and Emma Lee. ‘I’m just really proud of this album,’ said Stone, recently in an interview with the Cape Breton Post. ‘I think people are going to like it so I’m excited for them to hear it.’”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Exclaim! hosts an exclusive stream of Ben Watt‘s Hendra: “Previously described by Watt as ‘a folk-rock record in an electronic age,’ the 10-song set (or 14, including digital bonus tracks), the record was tracked between Berlin and London, with Watt teaming up in the respective cities with ex-Suede guitarist Bernard Butler and Berlin-based producer Ewan Pearson. A classic and soft ’70s singer-songwriter feel permeates piano- and synth-heavy tracks like ‘Spring,’ and ‘Hendra,’ while a steadier, buzzier rock feel soaks the setting of ‘Nathaniel.’ The tender, bird chirp-assisted ‘The Levels’ brings out personal lyrics and guest guitar work from Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour.”

Listen to the album HERE.

Said The Gramophone on Nap EyesWhine of the Mystic: “Nap Eyes’ Whine of the Mystic is a ragged splendour, one of the best things in ages. A band from Halifax with a sound like young caterpillar and old silk, like the Velvet Underground and Electrelane and Destroyer and Guided by Voices. Like liking a drink you know isn’t good for you; that’s good for you, that’s good for you, that you know isn’t good for you…Nap Eyes’ songs are mazey and riddled, but ambivalent about their mazes, ambivalent about their riddles; in this way they remind me of good smoke, holy incense smoke, always true to its incantation.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Weekly Charts:
#18 - Nap Eyes– Whine of the Mystic
#50 - Fearing & White - Tea and Confidences

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Charts:
#2 - Fearing & White - Tea and Confidences

Week-End Wrap Up • 04.04.14

March7-2014

The Chronicle Herald features Carleton Stone and his new album Draws Blood: “Stone is also excited about being backed by a band again for these public-industry showcases in Charlottetown, playing with fellow Gordie Sampson Songcamp alumni Dylan Guthro and Breagh Mackinnon, plus Young River’s Mike Ouellette and Matt Thauvette. It’s been exactly a year since he started recording Draws Blood in Toronto with co-producers Howie Beck (Feist, Hanna Georgas) and Broken Social Scene’s Jason Collett. ‘I definitely didn’t rush into this recording,’ says Stone, who was looking for something different than the rootsier sound of his solo debut with producer and co-writer Hawksley Workman. ‘I had to have that musician’s existential moment where you think, ‘OK, it’s time to make another record. Oh, I don’t know if I have the songs ready, what do I have to say?’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Babysue on Carleton Stone‘s Draws Blood: “Nice smooth melodic pop…This young fellow has a sound that is immediately familiar. The songs on Draws Blood have a great deal of commercial potential so if all the pieces fall into place…Mr. Stone could end up being hugely successful. Instead of sounding like a new studio album, this disc sounds more like a best of collection because virtually every one of these ten tracks sounds like a hit single.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Coast on Carleton Stone‘s Draws Blood: “Cape Bretoner Stone took his act to Toronto and got some sheen from producers Jason Collett (Broken Social Scene) and Howie Beck. The most BSS-sounding track is “Signs of Life,” with thundering drums, gentle horns and tendency to run long. Some touches, like prominent looped handclaps on the title song, run counter to the east coast musical playbook, if such a thing exists. More successful is ‘The Darkness,’ slowly building layers of dread against a multi-sourced bottom. Guitar sounds run through reggae, psychedelia (‘Like a Knife’) and Coldplay atmospherics. With Stone’s songs thriving in this setting, he may need a bigger band.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Carleton Stone performs “When You Come Home” from Draws Blood on Global Morning Halifax. Check it out below.

Weird Canada on Nap EyesWhine of the Mystic: “Considering the eccentric history of Nigel Chapman’s songwriting, it’s no surprise that Montreal’s anticipated new label,Plastic Factory, chose Whine of the Mystic as its first release. Recorded at the elusive Drones Club, this saintly record radiates with the light of the community from which it was born. The instrumentation of Halifax veterans Josh Salter, Seamus Dalton, and Brad Loughead mutate Chapman’s empathetic folk into anthemic grooves. Sometimes noisy, sometimes introspective, but always tasteful, Nap Eyes are a band you can proudly take home to Mom.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Portals on Nap Eyes‘ Whine of the Mystic: “Though Nap Eyes may be backed by some notable players—lead guitarist Brad Loughead also plays in Each Other, and bassist Josh Salter and drummer Seamus Dalton make up one half of Monomyth—it is vocalist and songwriter Nigel Chapman that makes this group so exciting to me. Chapman is Nap Eyes’ racing brain, bleeding heart and tremulous voice; and on Whine of the Mystic, it seems he’s found a new confidence and a new muse. These nine tracks are among the most musically upbeat in the band’s short catalog, and yet they also feature some of Chapman’s most introspective and personal writing to date. Whereas previous Nap Eyes releases felt sour in their outlook, Whine of the Mystic finds the band sounding almost vulnerable: Chapman has begun to open up to his audience, discharging his inner turmoil and having a bit of tongue-in-cheek fun along the way.”

Read the whole review HERE.

BRBR on Nap EyesWhine of the Mystic: “Les tentatives psychédéliques (‘Dreaming Solo’) ont le prestige d’une ballade en Westfalia en Californie. Entre la force de frappe de sa rythmique primaire (‘No Man Needs To Care’) et ses ambitions garages, Nap Eyes tire son épingle du jeu grâce à une série d’improvisations hypnotiques (‘No Fear of Hellfire’). Whine of the Mystic, c’est le kid mystérieux au perfecto de cuir, accoté contre la clôture dans la cour de récréation, qui cite Kerouac, se fait un plaisir de te partager sa clope, mais n’hésitera pas à te donner une rose au bal des finissants.”

Read the whole review, en français, HERE.

Americana UK on Kim Harris‘ Only The Mighty: “First impressions of this album suggest a record created around the call of the wild. This is a debut which has nature at its core, from the organic opening strains of ‘In the Woods’ there are recurring themes to be found. Grace, beauty and a playful exploration of the essence of life are the messages to be found through the medium of Kim Harris’ extraordinary voice and heartfelt piano…Warm, musically uplifting observations on the human spirit single her out as one to keep in mind for UK tour dates.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Babysue on Kim Harris‘ Only The Mighty: “This would already be a stunning and impressive collection of tunes. But it is even more so when you consider the fact that this is Kim’s debut album. What a debut. While the songs on Only The Mighty might remind listeners of a host of other modern classic singer/songwriters, there’s heart and soul here that is sadly missing in the content provided by most artists. And in terms of lyrics, Harris is truly exceptional…Top pick.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Chronicle Herald features the ECMA‘s new Executive Director, Andy McLean: “Andy McLean is getting the most fun on-the-job training you could imagine, at East Coast Music Week in Charlottetown. On Tuesday, the event’s organizers, the East Coast Music Association, announced the Manchester, U.K. native and co-founder of Toronto’s long-running North By Northeast music festival and conference as its new executive director. As a key player in NXNE at its inception in 1994 and its managing director for 18 years, and a musician himself — McLean formed Toronto ’80s pop band the Tenants shortly after first coming to Canada — he has the appropriate skill set for taking the reins of an organization and event similar to what he started in Ontario 20 years ago.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Guardian previews Eastlink East Coast Music Week 2014: “After the week of weather that East Coasters have had, the message seems to be clearly written in the snow: We’re all in need of one blast of a good party. And for all those with some of the most severe cases of spring cabin fever imaginable, the place to be will be right here, as East Coast Music Week 2014 will take Charlottetown by storm in just a matter of days. Upwards of 350 artists and several hundred music industry delegates will be arriving to the snow-piled Charlottetown streets during the next two days, as official ECMW events begin Wednesday and carry on through to Sunday.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Athabasca Advocate features Fearing & White and their new album Tea and Confidences: “‘We had 10 years to do that (first album), and the second one we had very little time,’ Fearing said. Last summer, the pair had four days in between festivals in Vancouver and on Salt Spring Island. They holed up in an inn with a pull-out couch and a loft and, in a marathon session over four days, came out the other side with a nearly finished product. ‘We bought a bunch of food and several bottles of wine and just had it out,’ said Fearing. ‘Sitting down and basically writing 11 songs over four days is quite a feat. I think they’re really great songs; it was really spontaneous.’”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Vish Khanna talks to Peter Elkas about the 10-year anniversary re-release of his record, Party of One: “Elkas and I discuss the 12-string Fender Stratocaster he brought along to our interview, Randy Bachman, Full House, how many guitars is too many guitars for a general audience to care about, dadhood and having to explain things to small humans, my dad can build you a bookshelf and I can barely build you a sandwich, demystifying the power of our dads, 10 years since Party of One and its “gimmicky” reissue, small people playing piano, the struggle of sit-ups, how we can’t remember the name of the movie A Scanner Darkly, Don Kerr as musical saviour for Pete after Local Rabbits ended, a band from Windsor called the Poumons and another outfit called the Burt Neilson Band, the Light of Day foundation and Pete’s role in it, the multiple times he’s shared stages with/met/fingerprinted/performed before rock icon Bruce Springsteen, playing the Stone Pony in New Jersey, passion versus practicality versus pain, the beneficially slow prep for a follow-up to Pete’s last album Repeat Offender, the song ‘I See Fine,’ and more.”

Listen to the whole podcast HERE.

Vue Weekly on LIVINGSTON: Artificially Intelligent Folk Songs of Canada, Vol. 1: “…this is a lovely collection of soothing barn lifters, that will easily while away 20 or so minutes. Horns and strings breeze through this collection in a Harvest-era Neil Young kind-of way, providing easy comfort and accessibility. It’s hard to tell how legitimate Livingston is, as a document of Canadian folk (especially with the Eagles mash up) but if Livingston is a real entity, then this is a pretty rootsy little experiment, one that could endlessly evolve through repeated incarnations and contributors. That alone is enough reason to keep Livingston on your radar.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! catches up with Dog Day for their monthly Music School: Where I Play feature: “Tucked away on the edge of the Halifax Regional Municipality, the surfers braving the Atlantic’s frigid temperatures are the sign you’re almost at the small bungalow Seth Smith and Nancy Urich call home. Walking through the front door, visitors are faced with a split-level set of stairs. Head up to find a typical suburban household; downstairs is an altogether different story. Along with providing a roof over the heads of Smith, Urich and their brand new baby boy, this isolated bungalow is also home to Fundog Studio, where, as Dog Day, the couple recorded last year’s Fade Out, and its 2011 predecessor, Deformer, amongst the litany of creative projects the two always have on the go. ‘Downstairs,’ says Smith, ‘is where the fun begins.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

CTV Atlantic‘s Section Six features The Heavy Blinkers. Watch the video HERE.

The Line of Best Fit‘s Oh! Canada 24 compilation features Nap Eyes and Gianna Lauren. Download the compilation, for free, HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Weekly Charts:
#13 - Nap Eyes– Whine of the Mystic
#48 - Fearing & White - Tea and Confidences

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Charts:
#5 – LIVINGSTON – Artificially Intelligent Folk Songs of Canada, Vol. 1
#7 - Fearing & White - Tea and Confidences

Week-End Wrap Up • 03.28.14

March27-2014

Rocky Mountain Outlook features Fearing & White and their latest album Tea and Confidences: “Fearing says the big difference between the two records is the duo tried to rein themselves in on the first and let themselves have more freedom on Tea and Confidences.’We didn’t want to go too crazy with overdubs, we thought let’s minimally do what we can here, flesh the songs out, but not overdo it,’ Fearing said. ‘With this record we thought, Let’s let the songs dictate what we’re gonna do. If it feels like we want to have a drum kit and a couple of electric guitars, then let’s do that and that’s exactly what we did. On one song there’s actually two drum kits, so it was kind of the opposite again of the first record – we didn’t put any parameters on ourselves as to how we should make the record – we just let the songs dictate.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Sherwood Park News features Fearing & White and Tea and Confidences:“What Fearing and White alike realized early on with Tea and Confidences was they wanted to allow the songs themselves to dictate the tempo and flow of the album. Where the debut record featured a more stripped down sound, the sophomore would showcase a more fleshed out approach. ‘With Fearing and White, it’s funny because our first record we went into the studio and we tried to limit ourselves in terms of what two guys could do — we always had in mind that we’d be touring later on as a duo,’ Fearing explained. “With this record, we thought let’s just let the songs dictate and not put parameters on it. If we want to do many guitar overdubs, let’s do that.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Alternate Root on Fearing & White‘s track “This Isn’t Hollywood” from Tea and Confidences: “The multiple album that accommodate Stephen Fearing and his guitar is not as surprising as his ability to walk into a genre, wear it like custom-made clothing and never lose the brand of quality that comes stamped on his songs. ‘This Isn’t Hollywood’ adopts a California nonchalance and knicks a west coast groove  that laps against the shores of the song with gentle waves of sound.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! previews the new Glory Glory single “Indigo Son” : “The song is a breezy pop cut that begins that mixes electronic textures with organic elements, offering hazy chillwave vibes and lushly pop-centric production. The accompanying lyric video compliments to the soft-focus sonics with bleary hues and hand-drawn quirkiness.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Canadian Beats on Glory Glory‘s So Long: “The final song ‘Everybody Lies’ would have to be my favourite, it is more upbeat than the other two, but still continues with the same captivating vocals that pull you in to begin with. The lyrics to this song are relatable, with the chorus that states, ‘Everybody lies, open up your eyes, everybody lies, sometimes, but open up your eyes.’ I found myself singing along with this song after the first listen, which isn’t a common occurrence.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Southern Souls features Nap Eyes and their debut full-length Whine of the Mystic: “By the time his new project, Nap Eyes, debuted in 2011, I felt like I had gained some ground. I had spent the interim years coming to love his particular mode of artistry, internalizing The Mighty Northumberland albums bit by bit. Getting to witness Nap Eyes, a four-piece with Josh Salter, Seamus Dalton and Brad Lahead, from its inception was like watching a prized portrait being cut into an intricate new puzzle. I felt lucky to be on the cusp of such a fascinating band. I felt even luckier when, this past January, I received a digital advance of Nap Eyes’ incredible debut LP, Whine Of The Mystic, with plenty of time to bone-up before sitting down with Nigel to discuss it. As a wonderful compliment to my weeks of close listening, Nigel, in a typically pensive and selfless mood, had a lot to offer in the way of understanding.”

Read the whole Q&A HERE.

The Delete Bin on The Pinecones“That’s The Way I Wanna Do It” from Ooh! : “What would happen if you took power pop, added some strings, and some Brill Building era Carole King-like melodic instincts? Well, imagine no further with Toronto’s The Pinecones. This song is taken from the band’s succinctly named full-length, Ooh!”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Exclaim! previews the You’ve Changed Records five year anniversary parties: “The label will be holding a two-night showcase in Toronto and Ottawa on May 22 and 23, respectively. The Hogtown hoedown takes place at the Horsheshoe Tavern, while Ottawa’s St. Albans Church will host the second night of festivities. Both shows will feature performances from the Weather Station, Shotgun Jimmie, Baby Eagle, Richard Laviolette and Marine Dreams, all of which having released material on the label in one form or another over the last few years. The press sheet adds that ‘special guests may be present and presented too.’”

Read the whole piece HERE.

The Cadre on Wet Denim‘s self-titled debut: “The phrase, ‘wet denim,’ conjures up memories of the cold and unpleasant feeling of walking around in damp jeans after getting caught in the rain.  The band Wet Denim, on the other hand, is producing quite the opposite effect with their seductive, sweet sounds lightly pumping through the speakers. According to their Tumblr, the band describes their music as ‘sincere between-the-sheets pop;’ which is a very fitting description. The layered vocals and ethereal harmonies recall music from decades long past, while still being current.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Global Morning Halifax features Frontier Developments as they unveil their newest game, Elite: Dangerous. Watch the piece below:

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Charts:
#1 – LIVINGSTON – Artificially Intelligent Folk Songs of Canada, Vol. 1

See the full charts HERE.

Week-End Wrap Up • 03.21.14

March21

Noisey speaks to the inventor of LIVINGSTON about Artificially Intelligent Folk Songs of Canada, Vol. 1: “The LIVINGSTON program takes its name from the wonderfully obscure and eccentric (read: completely fictional) Canadian folklorist Staunton R. Livingston. Livingston is a personality invented by Svec, the basis of a long-running performance piece about Canadian folklore, and a man who is said to be responsible for unearthing an album of lost Stompin’ Tom recordings and discovering an album of songs written by CFL players in the 70s. In reality, both are actually albums of songs written by Svec and performed with a bunch of musicians that have gone viral and continue to be attributed to the fake folklorist thanks to brilliantly orchestrated media ruses…To find out what it’s like working with a seemingly insane, all-knowing, folk song writing machine and what this kind of technology means for the future of music, we sat down with Dr. Svec and attempted to gauge whether or not we should be taking shelter from the clearly imminent musical robot uprising.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Gauntlet on LIVINGSTON: Artificially Intelligent Folk Songs of Canada, Vol. 1: “I’ve seen enough sci-fi to be weary of artificial intelligence anything, but if the future sounds anything like Livingston’s Artificially Intelligent Folk Songs of Canada, Vol. 1 we needn’t worry as much as I thought…Overall, Vol. 1 is a perfect balance between catchy, upbeat tunes and heartfelt folk ballads making it a surprisingly addictive album. Computers making folk music may just be the most radical thing to happen to folk music since Dylan went electric, but any artificial intelligence that likes Don Henley can’t be all bad.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The MusicNerd on Fearing & White‘s Tea and Confidences: “Both Stephen Fearing and Andy White are acclaimed artists in their own right. So what happens when the duo reunite for their second recorded effort together? Listening to the way that the duo blends folk, pop and rock together, the results are nothing less than spectacular. Rather than each singer-songwriter trying to claim his share of the spotlight, they play off each other and work together, bringing their respective strengths to be brought to the forefront. This is especially evident on ‘This Isn’t Hollywood,’ ‘Another Time Another Place’ and the bluesy ‘We Came Together.’ It’s simply a shame that they don’t do this more often.”

Read the whole review HERE.

FolkWords on Fearing & White‘s Tea and Confidences: “There’s an alchemy at work here. The symbiosis between singer-songwriters Canadian Stephen Fearing and Belfast native Andy White, moves beyond transforming base metal into noble metal, toTea and Confidences’ – an album of considerable presence. The charisma of this album manifests itself throughout the spread of the songs, as it move seamlessly between pulsing guitar-driven energy, deeply felt endearing ballads and powerful personal statements.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Weird Canada on Wet Denim‘s self-titled debut: “The four members of Wet Denim have musical fingerprints all over the Halifax scene (see: Cousins, Cactus Flower and the Just Barelys), but make no mistake: their debut album is filled with songs that belie the side-project tag they may receive. This music is unabashedly pop, brimming with melodies that embrace, and slight turns of phrase that tickle the brain. It’s earnestly sweet with an ornery underbelly, like a Nova Scotian hillside where wildflowers are indistinguishable from weeds.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Listen With Monger on Wet Denim: “The ladies of Wet Denim have carefully crafted their lo-fi indie jangle with the added treat of some Manzarek-esque keys work sprinkled liberally throughout the album. The wild west chords of ‘Small Town’ show this keys work off perfectly as the subdued vocals emerge from the smoky shadows like a sultry siren song. There is a wonderfully sunny, West Coast feel to ‘Surf Song’ that is somewhere between Best Coast, the Beach Boys and the Carpenters but then ‘Take A Walk’ has a more English feel to it with its rippling notes like freshly melted spring water running over smooth, rounded pebbles. The album finishes with a track called ‘Truth Bombs’ which sounds like something Rikki Lake would ‘drop’ on her 90s chat show but is in fact highly reminiscent of other LWM favourites September Girls. Wet Denim have a great ability for making infectious but gentle indie pop tunes that put you in a damn fine mood.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Chart Attack on You’ll Never Get To Heaven‘s Adorn: “You’ll Never Get To Heaven’s new EP Adorn is out this week. It includes ‘By This River,’ one of our favourite tracks of February, plus five extra songs that both reinforce and expand on the notion of Chuck Blazevic and Alice Hansen as one of Canada’s most colourful atmospheric pop duos. It’s the kind of music you want your brain to start playing the moment you realize you’re in a lucid dream, start to prong your subconscious’s version of the past, and realize: No, you dumped herBy the river.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

The Coast features Nap Eyes and their new album, Whine of the Mystic: “The album’s nine tracks sound nostalgic and new, with a Pavement-like force that meets the novelty of Chapman’s slick vocals. Recorded live at the Drones Club in Montreal, [Nigel] Chapman agrees there are ‘certain threads that appeal to us all,’ from folk to rock. Nap Eyes is genre-elusive but inclusive. ‘Things naturally fit together in the mix, and musically,” says Chapman of the live recording process. “It does have advantages. You get the feeling of the song, everyone’s feeling of the song, as all one take. Even the mistakes sound natural.’”

Read the whole piece HERE.

The Uniter on Kim HarrisOnly The Mighty: “This debut release from Newfoundland born Halifax resident Kim Harris is lush, pretty, hip and strikingly diverse. Opener ‘In the Woods’ could sit alongside Yo La Tengo in your headphones, while ‘The Weight Of It All’ challenges the best from Adele, and ‘Dust’ & ‘Poet Hearts’ sneak into the indie zone of Radio 2 Drive staples Ohbijou and Jenn Grant. Aside from the fleshed out instrumentation and production, the songs would work even if it was a simple piano and vocal record, due to their genuine lyrics and Harris’ vocal acrobatics. Hannah Georgas, Joel Plaskett and Mike O’neill should watch their backs.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! talks to Dog Day about the band’s future: “Since releasing Fade Out in the fall, Seth Smith and Nancy Urich have threatened to retire their long-running Dog Day project for good. The couple just gave birth to a baby, their first, and their attention is understandably focused on child rearing for the time being. ‘Doing this kid thing, like all our projects, we want to do it right,’ Smith tells Exclaim! ‘So we’re giving our music some distance so we can work on this until we feel ready to go back to it.’ Smith adds that their new parenthood won’t inhibit their ability to make music. Rather, it will simply change the couple’s approach. ‘We’re definitely not going to quit music,’ he says. ‘I always have to be toying with stuff. If I’m not doing something I feel like I’m not doing enough.’”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Roctober on Nudie‘s Remember This: “Although ‘Nudie’ is a name that certainly brings to mind the glory days of Country and Western music, as glittering Nudie suits adorned greats like Porter Waggoner and Faron Young (and I seem to remember Webb Pierce caught in a rhinestone cobweb suit), it also invokes Nashville artifice and excess. So the fact that this Canadian country troubadour whose lyrically sublime songs seem spare, sincere, and poignant named himself after the Ukrainian sparkle-suitmaker seems odd. In fact, the sincerity of the late Canuck superpatriot Stompin’ Tom is brought to mind, so maybe Stompie would be a better moniker. But names aside, this is one of the best country albums I’ve heard in a long spell. During that brief moment in the 80s when it felt like Dwight Yoakum, Randy Travis, George Strait, k.d. lang, and Lyle Lovett might re-make the commercial country music industry to be all great again, this would have fit right in, but in 2014 it’s a revelation!”

Read the whole review HERE.

Zachary Lucky performs “Ramblin’ Man’s Lament” from his latest album The Ballad of Losing You for Exclaim!TV. Check it out:

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Weekly Charts:
#32 - Nap Eyes– Whine of the Mystic

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Charts:
#8 – LIVINGSTON – Artificially Intelligent Folk Songs of Canada, Vol. 1

Top 200 National Monthly Charts for February 2014:
#5 – Dog Day – Fade Out
#32 – Wet Denim – Wet Denim
#107 – Nudie – Remember This
#196 – Nap Eyes – Whine of the Mystic

Top 20 National Monthly Folk/Roots/Blues Charts for February 2014:
#13 – Nudie – Remember This

See the full charts HERE.

xxx clvr Mix and Q&A • 03.21.14

028_28

I think the first time I heard about Weirdo Click was when a friend mentioned a great show they played at a small venue called Sad Rad. From there, they just seemed to come up in conversation with everyone I talked to. After looking into their music, it was pretty obvious that they were doing something that was lacking around these parts. So, a few months later when the folks at Sappyfest asked me for last minutes suggestions, they were the first act that came to mind.

*Sidenote, when Sappy checked-in with them about playing, they got this amazing note back:

“WOW WOW
To be very honest I read the first part & got really stoked and didn’t read the rest yet but allow me to prematurely say yes. all caps though like YES because that was just my real life reaction to this like 2 mins ago.”

Soon after Sappy, Alex (xxx clvr) and I started chatting about music over email. He’s a fascinating guy. Sometimes his emails are two broken lines on how Shad looks like Curren$y or something about the movie Basquiat. Other times, he’ll send pages of theories on Buddhism and a new age of communication.

Recently, he showed up out of nowhere with a mix for us to post…which happens to feature his new single. I thought I’d attach a brief Q&A section with it.

So, here’s some excellent music for your Friday and a brief look into the mind of xxx clvr.

Matt: Where are you coming from with the new single? What are some of the main influences behind it?

xxx clvr: The new single is motivational, in the way that having nothing motivates you. It’s part of a collection that emphasis revenge & in this case revenge is about being successful. Also Im a chopped & screwed enthusiast ( rip dj screw ) & the producer, GreyscaleSound, made me a chopped version so that’ll definitely be the first edit released.

M: What else have you been working on lately?

xxx: I’ve been working on live show visuals. Writing new material for me & my brother Aux’s project later this year. Making glow in the dark shirts for my friends. Writing for my next solo release which will be in 2015 & trying to not shop online pretty unsuccessfully.

M: How do you find the majority of the music you listen to? What has been something you’ve stumbled on lately that was exciting?

xxx: I search the internet til my eyes close on they’re own. Views & ratings & buzz really don’t mean shit to me. I kind’ve search on the principle that good music is always in existence, even if its not the most readily available or highly promoted over the top 40 trash so I really leave nothing un touched. Even if i don’t link w them I’ll end up finding whole scene’s & collectives in like Australia or Ohio and they hold it down & have an aesthetic of they’re own its tight.

M: Who is the most exciting new producer you’re listening to?

xxx: Hands down, my nigga Woadie. I’m blessed to have a few joints from him on that 2015 release. Hit his soundcloud & bring ur bae.

M: With the endless access the internet provides to music/art/culture, what changes are you seeing in the way people approach making art?

xxx: Wow. well I hate to do this but its overwhelmingly negative. Very fake based. The internet has given everybody a platform and thats great. However I see so much insincerity, people making music just for money as if the two going hand in hand isn’t reserved for those with talent & ambition. I see alot of fans, inspired to the point of making music & thats a beautiful thing but, if you make music that sounds like someone who’s already famous for making that type of music you’re really not even trying to be yourself. I see that the most. A lack of being yourself. Drake is doing drake pretty fucking well these last few years so maybe don’t try to beat Drake at being Drake & just be yourself.

M: What did you tell Steve Cutler (who directed xxx clvr’s video for #RIP#) you wanted the #RIP# video to look like before he started?

xxx: Well, usually I come with a concept to build onto but with Steve I just said, lets do a video for this song & he poured his brain into his desktop & let it sit there a few days before coming to me w a vision & a list of equipment he’d need. So here I am ready to like get the squad together, get a stack together & cop this gear for him to progress with it. Except nah, Mark & him (SUNS) really Macgyver’d the shit out of this video & built the equipment from scratch with like ceiling fan machinery & a chest mount harness.

M: How would you describe it now?

xxx: I would describe it now as the slow but peaceful decline of anyone trying to make it home on they’re own after a particularly rough night. Which, if you’d like, could translate to making it through life & career even with the amount of obstacles & substances in your way and in your body.

xxx clvr – #RIP# from suns on Vimeo.

M: Name five mind-bending pieces of art in any medium.

xxx: Fight Club, Princess Mononoke, http://prettypuke.com, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpz1W4fN0uI & http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Op9Iy7yZts

M: You mentioned there’s new Weirdo Click stuff in the works? How is it coming along?

xxx: Yeah, been fun so far just throwing around ideas & making a few rough tracks via email rn. Aux is producing most of it, along w a few friends adding personal touches & mixing. Its coming, hopefully 2k14.

M: How are you enjoying Toronto so far?

xxx: Its tight. Canada’s New York lol. I like anywhere you can walk in a room & see a good mix of different cultures.

Week-End Wrap Up • 03.14.14

Jan31

Americana UK on Nudie‘s Remember This: “The music is straightforward country and takes its style from country stalwarts such as Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard and Hank Williams. While the aforementioned inspirations for Nudie’s sound are clear, the album is not too derivative, Nudie has his own unmistakeable vocal delivery and lyrical style… Pair this with a solid musical backing and you have yourself a very enjoyable album from Nudie.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Family Reunion Country on Nudie‘s Remember This: ”With a relaxed vocal style somewhere between Corb Lund and Marty Stuart, Nudie brings the twelve songs on this album to life with a ‘matter of fact’ storytelling cadence. And his sharp wit shines fresh light on many familiar topics. In the lead track, ‘If a Heart Could Tell,’ for instance, Nudie ponders what relationships would be like if hearts could tell the truth from a lie and avert heartbreaks before they happened… The sparse musical arrangement of this song rides on just an undulating guitar riff and a steady drum back beat. The song has a cool groove that plays like a syncopated heartbeat which permeates the rest of the album.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Steve Says on Nudie‘s Remember This: “The 12-song, 36-minute effort often harkens back to the earlier days of country, when western was often appended to it, even though Nudie was born in Ontario and now resides in Prince Edward Island. The west meets east model shines through on opener ‘If A Heart Could Tell,’ which features guest vocals from Molly Rankin — the youngest member of the prolifically talented and Maritime-proud Rankin Family.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Cadre on Kim HarrisOnly The Mighty: “The ten-track album is the full-length debut from the Halifax-based beauty. From the album’s artwork to the songs themselves, Only the Mighty is whimsical, soulful, and hauntingly beautiful. The upbeat songs like ‘Dust’ and ‘In The Woods’ are fun and act as instant mood-enhancers. While songs like ‘If I So Desire’ and ‘The Weight Of It All’ are better suited to quiet contemplation while sipping glasses of wine. No matter the occasion you shouldn’t have a problem finding a Kim Harris song to go along with it.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Pennyblackmusic on Banded StiltsLittle Village: “With varied instrumentation including mandolin, violin and banjo, Banded Stilts’ ‘Little Village’ is a fine mix of music. The album is a blend of contemporary folk and alternative roots – down home and comforting… Through their array of stories shared and through their use of eclectic folk instrumentation, Banded Stilts create an album that provides a source of genuine comfort.”

Read the whole review HERE.

CBC’s Take Liberty features Carleton Stone and his new album Draws Blood. Listen to the feature HERE.

Exclaim! previews the 10th anniversary vinyl re-press of Peter ElkasParty of One: “Originally issued on CD through MapleMusic in 2004, the LP is being pressed up by Elkas himself in a run of 200 copies, marking the first time the 10-song set has appeared on wax. According to a press release, the record was made shortly after Local Rabbits went on ‘indefinite hiatus,’ with Elkas prepping a platter’s worth of ‘soulful pop and rock songs that are AM radio-accessible.’”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Quiet Parade stops by CKDU’s Hey, I Like Your Music for a feature interview and performance. Take a listen HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Weekly Charts:
#25 - Dog Day– Fade Out
#41 - Kim Harris – Only The Mighty
#45 – Nap Eyes – Whine of the Mystic

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Charts:
#6 – LIVINGSTON – Artificially Intelligent Folk Songs of Canada, Vol. 1

See the full charts HERE.

Week-End Wrap Up • 03.07.14

March7-2014

The Lance on Carleton Stone‘s Draws Blood: “The stone weathered, grungy text of Stone’s name on the album art and the title itself allude to the darker songs, such as ‘Like a Knife,’ ‘Signs of Life,’ ‘The Darkness’ and ‘Draws Blood’ while the image is lighter and more hopeful like ‘What I Want’ and ‘Love Into The Night.’ The album’s title song ‘Draws Blood’ has an upbeat melody that is matched to gloomier lyrics. The main theme of the song is expressed in the first line, ‘All the things you can’t get back.’ While you are carried along by the cheery sound, you realize how much people hold onto the past and how the only way to be free of it all is to let go. Stone offers advice at the end, ‘I don’t know where to begin/ Except draw blood/ Draws blood.’”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Gauntlet on Carleton Stone‘s Draws Blood: “Nova Scotia musician Carleton Stone’s third album, Draws Blood, is an excellent singer-songwriter experience with a blend of rock, pop and country influences — even jazzy trumpet melodies make a prominent appearance. Draws Blood opens with ‘Blood Is Thicker Than Water,’ which is rich in creative instrumentals and compelling vocals. However, the second song is even more absorbing. The impressive rhythms and backing vocals make ‘Climbing Up The Walls’ shine as one of the most memorable songs on the album.”

Read the whole review HERE.

CBC‘s Bob Mersereau on Carleton Stone‘s Draws Blood: “Draws Blood sees Stone team up with some hot-shots, to great results. It’s produced by Howie Beck and Jason Collett, Beck famous for his own albums and working with Feist and Hayden, and Collett being the mainstay of Broken Social Scene. This doesn’t mean some kind of switch to alternative sounds or pop experiments for Stone though. Wisely the duo left him to do his thing, songwriter material, whether it’s a simple, effective acoustic number ‘When You Come Home,’ about those open arms waiting for someone returning from the road, or the more upbeat ‘What I Want.’ There are more modern touches, bits of keyboards and beats that makes the sound contemporary, but they don’t take away from the song. It’s still Stone up front, with a winning, sincere voice.”

Read the whole review HERE.

New Canadian Music on Carleton Stone‘s Draws Blood: “On Draws Blood, the follow-up to 2011′s self-titled second album, Maritimes rocker Carleton Stone boasts quite the list of talented co-writers, including Mo Kenney, Emma-Lee, Andrew Austin, Jason Collett (Broken Social Scene), and the late Jay Smith (to whom the album is dedicated). Guest players include members of Zeus, Collett, and Howie Beck. The result is an album full of well-crafted pop-rockers highlighting Stone’s pleasingly melodic voice and cleanly produced by Collett and Beck. He’s already notching CBC play, and don’t be surprised if commercial stations follow.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Pop Geek Heaven on The Pinecones’ Ooh! : “Paul Linklater’s Toronto-based trio makes incandescent, luminous psychedelic rock that draws on the Yardbirds, the Hollies, the Beatles, the whole power pop panoply, sounding instantly familiar yet refreshingly new.  Ooh! detonates like a thermonuclear bomb at the corner of Sunset and Vine and doesn’t let up, beginning with the Yardbirds/Hollies mash-up of ‘Gloomy Monday’ in which Linklater’s guitar demands attention with fleet riffing usually associated with Al DiMeola or Les Paul. ‘It’s Always On My Mind’ ambles in like the Lovin’ Spoonful with an operatic, almost vocally expressive guitar solo.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Canuckistan Music on The PineconesOoh! : Fast forward a few years to 2013 and we find the Pinecones whittled down to a trio of Randall, Linklater and drummer Marshall Bureau. Their third LP, Ooh!, is steeped in those deliciously sweet riffs that flavoured much of 1970s power pop, a genre that always seemed to struggle for acceptance, lost somewhere amid the metal-worshipping radio waves and the more subversive punk-fuelled clubs. I am willing to bet that these guys have spent more than a few Saturday nights studiously spinning their scuffed-up Big Star, Raspberries and Dwight Twilley records… [The] jangly ‘Gloomy Monday’ and the hook-laden title track ought to keep your i-pad busy for a while.”

Read the whole review HERE.

CBC‘s Bob Mersereau on Fearing & White‘s Tea and Confidences: “Whereas [Fearing's] band is a roots-rocking bunch, and his solo work more personal and subdued, the Fearing & White album has a bit from both, and a more relaxed, light-hearted spirit as well. The pair aren’t just bringing out the acoustics; there are some full-on rockers here, such as Sanctuary, with it’s electric riffs and nasty bass and drums. Tomorrow Takes A Long Time is a funky folk number, and We Came Together is the Everly Brothers on steroids. Lyrically, the mood is positive, loving, even humorous, good vibes throughout. Best of all, every song features the pair trading verses, and best of all, singing close harmonies That’s the best part of finding solid partners, when it’s a fun working relationship, and a great sound.”

Read the whole review HERE.

New Canadian Music on Fearing & White‘s Tea and Confidences: “You’ve heard of supergroups, how about a super-duo? In roots music terms, Fearing and White qualify. Stephen Fearing is a Juno-winner as a member of Blackie and the Rodeo Kings and an acclaimed solo artist, while Aussie-based Irish songsmith Andy White is also a noted and prolific solo act. The two pals first teamed up in 2011 on Fearing and White, and Tea and Confidences is a fine sequel. Their voices harmonise superbly, and they fuse rock and folk elements seamlessly. The sound is built around fluent guitars, with drummer Gary Craig (BARK) adding some groove and Scott Merritt recording cleanly. The duo’s humour and energy leave many younger folk pretenders in their wake.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! previews the new AA Wallace video for “Lipstick And Stethoscopes”: “Directed and edited by Jeff Miller, the creative chillwave clip reimagines Wallace as a European psych rock star from an alternate reality performing on a Top of the Pops-style television program. Watch as the esoteric electronic artist croons his way through the video’s gold-hued landscapes, which is made even more futuristic by the band’s inclusion of a Casio synth guitar and hexagonal digital drum set.”

Check out the video HERE or below.

The Cadre on Nudie‘s Remember This: “His distinct name is a nod to designer Nudie Cohn, who created those amazing, elaborate suits worn by performers like Elvis Presley and Hank Williams back in the ’60s and ’70s. The album is a mix of raw emotion, fun, and storytelling.Remember This reminds me of the kind of pure country I grew up on. It’s honest, timeless, and it’s about more than trucks and dogs. Think of country legend Merle Haggard and Hank Williams.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Stylus Magazine on Dog Day‘s Fade Out: “The record feels a lot like its album cover looks, which is dark, deep, and ominous. If Sonic Youth only wrote poppy songs, usually under four minutes long, it might sound a lot like this (interestingly enough, the principal members of the band, Nancy Urich and Seth Smith are marries, which is also something that Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore once were). The album is full of heavy hooks and classic rock riffs, which sound badass on tracks like the relentlessly misanthropic ‘Alone With You.’”

Read the whole review HERE (p. 23)

The Coast features Magnolia: “Genre-wise, Magnolia is a bit tough to pigeonhole, for the better (‘We still struggle with that,’ says Hoffman). There’s a folk core with jazz accents, poppy and bluesy, smoky and country, with a telltale swing that’s a clear result of Costelo’s influence. Lyrically the songs are about relationships, sung by Hoffman in a clear bell of a voice (MacLean pops up once on the mic, he says he’s still learning to be comfortable in that role). The producer asked them for a list of artists before recording started, and it included Paul Simon, Feist, Nina Simone and Bob Dylan.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Cape Breton Post writes about several ECMA honourary award recipients: “The East Coast Music Association has announced that Rita MacNeil and Jay Smith will be honoured posthumously during East Coast Music Week in April. MacNeil, who died last year of complications following surgery at the age of 68, will be recognized with the Directors’ Special Achievement Award. Smith, who died last year at the age of 34 while on tour with Matt Mays in Edmonton, will be honoured with the Musician’s Achievement Award. It was also announced that Cape Breton’s Flo Sampson will be one of five people honoured with the Stompin’ Tom Award, alongside Alan Dowling, Kellie Walsh, Susan Hunter, and Bob Mersereau.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

This week, we launched the first episode of the Pigeon Row Podcast. The episode features an in-depth conversation on songwriting with Steve Lambke (Baby Eagle) and Simone Schmidt (Fiver, The Highest Order). Listen to this enlightening conversation between two of the country’s best:

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Weekly Charts:
#21 – Dog Day - Fade Out
#31 - Nap Eyes – Whine of the Mystic

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Charts:
#7 – Fearing & White – Tea and Confidences

See the full charts HERE.