Week End Wrap Up • 10.17.14

Oct17-2014

Pitchfork on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “…these short and intertwined tunes portray the stepwise process into love. They seem, however, written and played from a distance, so that the butterflies and doubts have settled into a graceful, logical arc. Lindeman’s voice flits and cracks, peaks and valleys, comforts and cries, not unlike that of Joni Mitchell. But she possesses the unwavering patience of Bill Callahan’s later records, delivering every word and worry like she’s pondered it all into acceptance.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

PopMatters on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Toronto’s Tamara Lindeman records as the Weather Station and her latest EP, What Am I Going to Do With Everything I Know is a statement, not a question. Compared with a feminine version of Sun Kil Moon, but sounding a whole lot like early Joni Mitchell, just without the flutter in her voice, the songs on the EP are lush and quiet. You get just Lindeman’s voice, her acoustic guitar, an occasional pedal steel guitar or background vocal, and perhaps a lightly brushed drum every now and again. What Am I Going to Do With Everything I Know doesn’t profess to have answers, but it is an on-point declaration from a potent and vital Canadian folk talent.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Verb on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Constructed around an acoustic guitar and her gossamer voice, What Am I Going To Do is short on hooks and long on lyrics…Once again, Lindeman dives into our tendency to ascribe meaning to things that seem to mean nothing. What Am I Going To Do offers few clear answers: she doesn’t know; nobody does. Even the most tantalizing hints — ‘It all becomes true if we say so’ — leave the record where it started, beautifully-wrought and spinning in an uncertain wind.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Grayowl Point on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “The meditative spirit of Tamara Lindeman (The Weather Station) and subsequently her keen attention to detail as found in her lyrics is entrancing. With so many strong folk voices in Canada right now, it’s too much to say that Lindeman is the only one keeping folk music alive in this country but it feels too little to say that she is, simply, a great addition to this circle of folksters. Lindeman is a force.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Sunken Sounds premieres the new EP from Vogue Dots, Mauka: “The upcoming release is truly a beautiful and highly progressive piece of work. During my first listen through Mauka I was honestly brought to tears at one point. The lyrics featured hold a great amount of depth and honesty that really just hit at home. Their dreamlike soundscapes though were able to quickly bring me back to comfort. The duo seamlessly web together an immense amount of emotions throughout each single one of the recordings.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Silent Shout on Vogue Dots“Way With Silence” : “So Vogue Dots keep getting better and better…So it’s no surprise that their latest, the lead single from their forthcoming Mauka EP is another extremely accomplished anthemic atmospheric electropop gem. With an incredibly evil arpeggiated coda. Dropped jaws over here!”

Read the whole review HERE.

Nexus Newspaper on Dan MacCormack‘s Symphony of Ghosts: “MacCormack emits a deep connection to Richards’ novels and translates their ideas from text to song. The first song, ‘Face Your Hunters,’ is powerful, starting off with the heartbeat-like rhythm of a drum (think tribal), featuring layered vocals and haunting lyrics. The remainder of Symphony of Ghosts is incredibly diverse, showcasing MacCormack’s talent as a multi-instrumentalist.”

Read the whole review HERE.

New Canadian Music on Dan MacCormack‘s Symphony of Ghosts: “The poetic title Symphony Of Ghosts is an apt hint at the literary bent of this lovely new debut album from Halifax-based songsmith Dan MacCormack (formerly in Grassmarket). It is inspired by the writing of famed Canadian novelist David Adams Richards, with each of the ten songs focused on a different Richards’ novel. The musical setting is Canadiana folk enriched with inventive arrangements and instrumentation (some top local players are featured) and the fine production of Jason Michael MacIsaac (Heavy Blinkers, Jenn Grant).”

Read the whole review HERE.

Killer Baby Tomatoes on Legato VipersLV: “Need some more surf in your life? Guelph four-piece Legato Vipers work through ’60s rock & roll rhythms and a bit of soul, but let the guitar do the talking. The slide can be chaotic on ‘Angel Dust’ or soft on ‘Sweet 16,’ and the lead gets more sentimental on ‘Bernie (Ernie McInerney).’ There’s a bit of a menacing tone (when you’re not getting The Good, the Bad and the Ugly vibes) throughout the record, but things get darkest with album-closer ‘Chocolate Milkshake.’ It’s probably the most evil chocolate milkshake you’ll ever hear.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! on Cam Smith‘s Cannon: “Plenty of MCs are torn between dance floors and street corners, but Haligonian rapper Cam Smith is one of the few willing to ponder that dilemma on wax. Over the trembling 808s of ‘The Son Or The Fall,’ the opening track on his new self-produced LP Cannon, he unspools deeply moving rhymes about street violence and friends that ‘heaven swallowed’” Then comes his biggest lament — that fans demand anything but therapeutic introspection.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Ears and Eyes Online on Community Theatre‘s Northern Register: “It’s a triumphant statement in collaborative music. It’s something that grabs you, takes your lunch money, and then takes you to a small cabin in the Yukon. The very one that these songs were pieced together in possibly. From a feeling of nautical adventure and boyish wonder on ‘The Quickening’ to the somehow similar feeling of drinking beers in your garage on ‘Snailhouse.’ This album wants to take you places and I hope you let it.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Coast previews the first few days of the Halifax Pop Explosion: “First of all, are you well-hydrated? Sufficiently rested? Do you have a good base going? Anything less than that signals peril, young HPX learner. The storied festival kicks off this Tuesday, and there’s still a lot of music-listening to be done before next Thursday’s HPX issue. Get a leg up on the pile and dive into a mid-week helping of Pop.”

Read the overview HERE, and check out their features on Mo Kenney, Astral Swans, Strange AttractorTeenage Kicks, and City Natives.

NOW Toronto on Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “…’Second Chances,’ the mellow title track of Slow Leaves’ 2013 EP, reprised here with Davidson’s Doug Paisley-like tenor backed by a Bandesque bass line, acoustic guitar and organ. Or the moonlit late-night-drive closer, ‘Rearview,’ with tinkling piano, harmonica and faraway ‘shoo-be-doops.’ On ‘Nostalgia,’ Davidson draws inspiration from Neil Young’s ‘Out On The Weekend.’ Elsewhere there’s a bit of boogie woogie (‘Life Of A Better Man’), and ‘Country Of Ideas’ bubbles with funky country rock.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! on Dean Drouillard‘s UFO Houses: “The album is entirely instrumental, and a press release points to sonic touchstones like George Harrison, Nils Cline, Ennio Morricone, Robert Fripp, Nick Drake and Jonny Greenwood. The nine tracks are said to be ‘hazy, dramatic vignettes,’ and the album was was recorded in a Toronto loft with producer Joshua Van Tassel (of Great Lake Swimmers), who also plays drums.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Charts:
#34 – Legato Vipers – LV
#44 – Coyote – Proof of Life

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Specialty Charts:
#2
 – Slow Leaves – Beauty Is So Common

Week End Wrap Up • 10.10.14

Oct10-2014

BeatRoute features The Constantines: “Unless you’ve been hiding out in some desolate cave for the past year, you’re probably aware that one of Canada’s most blistering and brilliant indie rock bands, the Constantines, have reunited to bring their fierce, fiery and frenetic live show to all of you unwashed masses once more. Celebrating the somewhat unorthodox 11th anniversary of their seminal album, Shine a Light, these belligerent boys are back together after a good four years of a sort-of-breakup-sort-of-hiatus and are more insane, energetic and excited than ever.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Vue Weekly features The Constantines: “If Webb reckons that the band was somewhat disconnected from its own music that doesn’t hold true for the fans. The band’s legend only grew in its time away, with old fans holding fast to their discography, and new fans joining on despite never seeing the group. ‘It was definitely surprising to see that people were still seeking us out after we stopped playing,’ says Webb.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Vancouver Sun features The Constantines: “Four years ago, [Steve] Lambke wasn’t sure the band’s route would even continue. After more than a decade together, frontman Bry Webb needed time away from the Cons, so they announced a hiatus with no firm plan to reunite. In the end, all five members worked on separate projects — Lambke, Webb and keyboardist Will Kidman each released solo albums, while drummer Doug MacGregor and bassist Dallas Wehrle joined other bands. The Cons also kicked around various reunion offers, but Lambke says the timing was either off or the schemes ‘didn’t feel right’ — until the fivesome decided to release and tour around the 11th anniversary edition of Shine A Light.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

The Toronto Star on The Constantines: “This gig was a joyous, fist-pumping shout-along from start to finish, and the band rose to the occasion by playing every bit as hard as they did as preternaturally talented youngsters 15 years ago…The Constantines remain one of the tautest, most disciplined and most explosive live acts ever to strut the stage. In a parallel universe, maybe they became the next Tragically Hip.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! on The Constantines: “Exhausting all of their hits early on in the evening clearly paved the way during the encore for a few deeper cuts, and the Cons did not disappoint. ‘Little Instruments’ and the downtempo ‘Lizaveta’ made appearances, as did low-key number ‘Hyacinth Blues,’ but the band saved perhaps the best for last with a cover of Lou Reed’s ‘Temporary Thing.’ It was a subtle reminder that although the band are back together, moments like these are ultimately fleeting. One thing will always be certain, though: the Constantines are one of the most consistent Canadian rock bands of all time.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Gorilla vs. Bear premieres “Way With Silence, the new single from Vogue Dots: “‘Way With Silence’ is the dreamily downcast new single from Canadian experimental pop duo Vogue Dots, taken from the group’s stellar new Mauka EP… Almost feels like a throbbing, significantly more danceable Beach House jam, until the duo takes a darker and more intense turn near the end.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Killer Baby Tomatoes previews “Way With Silence by Vogue Dots: “‘Way With Silence’ from New Brunswick-based synth-pop duo Vogue Dots moves along at a dreamy, dancey pace until the low end shows up for a minute of darkness.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Ride The Tempo on “Way With Silence” by Vogue Dots: “Vogue Dots just get better and better. The new single ‘Way With Silence’ is dark, evocative electro pop that pulls you in and won’t let you go. Not that you’ll want to be freed. Resistance is futile.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Silver Soundz on “Way With Silence” by Vogue Dots: “‘Way With Silence’ is the chilling new single from Canadian experimental/electronic-pop duo Vogue Dots. ‘Way With Silence’ stays true to the group’s devotion to the darker side of electronic music. The lush vocals meet electronically crafted melodies to create a dreamy darkness with a heavy bass undertone.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Faded Arrow on “Way With Silence” by Vogue Dots: “The gloomy first single from Mauka, ‘Way With Silence,’ establishes a thick and murky atmosphere on the opening beat, like a dark cloud lingering in your speakers. The song finally awakens near the end, unleashing a wave of chilling, devastating emotion.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

New Canadian Music on Fossil Cliffs: “There are some real interesting underground rock outfits emerging from the East Coast. To that list add Fossil Cliffs, a new solo project from Mike D’Eon, of the excellent Kuato…There’s a nice diversity in the material, from the stoner rock feel of ‘In My Eyes’ to the hypnotic ‘Wake Me Up.’ Trivia note: did you know there are actual physical Fossil Cliffs in Nova Scotia? This rock equivalent is equally impressive.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Ride The Tempo on Fossil Cliffs: “There’s math rock (‘Summer Sun’), downbeat indie folk rock (‘In My Eyes’) and a touch of ’90’s slacker alt pop (‘Wake Me Up’). ‘Cold’ is one of those odd, off-kilter folk numbers that you’d expect from Beck, and ‘Down and Out’ is like a cross between Fleet Foxes and Neil Young.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Scene Magazine on Fossil Cliffs: “Fossil Cliffs is a departure from the usually melodic slow-burn that is Kuato, where he plucks the strings. With Cliffs, D’Eon goes for the grizzled sludge rock/garage rock sound that you’ll recognize from jam sessions in your mom’s basement. Its dirty, its cool, its new tunes.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

New Canadian Music on LV, the new full-length from Legato Vipers: “There’s something timelessly appealing about the sound of a guitar-driven surf instrumental rock band, and that is reaffirmed by LV, the debut full-length album from Legato Vipers. There’s a pleasing sting to the sound of these Vipers, and if Tarantino is looking for new soundtrack material, he should check them out.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Grayowl Point on Legato VipersLV: “Whoever’s idea it was to say “Hey, the world needs an instrumental surf-rock band” deserves some credit for bringing Legato Vipers into existence. It’s hard to pinpoint exactly what makes this band so appealing—but it’s most likely the commitment to no frills and no bullshit, just a bunch of less-than-three-minute-long blasts of rock and roll.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Junnnktank on Cam Smith‘s Cannon: “Look, if you haven’t been paying attention to Cam before, his production or even his crazy videos like ‘Turbo’ and ‘Mad Crack,’ his album Cannon is sure to bring you in…Cam is here and he’s going to make damn sure we all take notice. We’ve taken notice.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Cam Smith stops by Global Morning Halifax to talk Cannon, Nova Scotia Music Week and Reebok. Check it out below.

The Cadre on Coyote‘s Proof of Life: “Proof of Life features six tracks that flow nicely, which makes the album great background music when writing papers or taking notes. The album is upbeat, catchy, and is full of youth and longing. The EP is quite unique when compared to many local indie bands…Coyote sounds like an indie band from America, rather than one from rural PEI.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Canuckistan Music on Coyote‘s Proof of Life: “…they peddle a sort of bubbly, guitar-driven pop sound that has one foot in the now and the other in the eighties, most notably those anthemic sing-alongs that Echo and the Bunnymen or U2 did so well…Those ought to keep the kids dancing, but for my money the cutesy ‘Old News’ is exactly that, a bouncy throwback to the best of the MTV years, a guilty pleasure that, windows closed and curtains drawn, we can all have some fun with.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Uniter on Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “…the pop sensibilities on ‘Life of a Better Man’ and Nick Drake-y opener ‘Everybody Wants to Be in Love’ are quite bright. ‘Dreamer’ is waiting to be placed on that mix for your new crush, while the twangy ‘Neighbourhood Watch’ is a gunslinger’s delight. ‘Institution’ might be the standout here, a subtle little dreamer that’s catchy without being intrusive. A solid, crisp disc that will likely take Davidson to the next level.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Reflector on Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “With Davidson’s poetic melodies and Matyas’ pop harmonic arrangement, this album is the perfect playlist for those late night study sessions. The first track of the album, ‘Everybody Wants to be in Love’ is nothing but pure honesty, with piano and guitar creating the perfect melody for the poetic lyrics…Beauty is so Common is a perfect showcase of Canadian talent. The album is definitely worth checking out.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The International Americana Music Show features Graham Nicholas and Bend The River on this week’s episode. Take a listen HERE.

Graham Nicholas stops by CP24 for a performance and a chat about his new album Sometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers. Watch the piece HERE.

Argue Job on Graham NicholasSometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers: “Nicholas’ characters are on full display here. His lyrics are a surgeon’s scalpel, spreading open the motivations and fears of his characters with a challenging clarity. Even when his tracks acquire an upbeat drive, as in “Sunday Kinda Love,” even then the song’s sense of humour and unabashed eroticism displays the honesty and intimacy of Nicholas’ songwriting…How welcome it is to find a folk singer with a talent for balancing clear songwriting and the need for pace and variety.”

Read the whole review HERE.

New Canadian Music on VKNGS: “The sound of hard-edged Haligonians VKNGS has been described as “post-hardcore.” The group features ex-members of bands such as North of America, The Holy Shroud, Union of the Snake, Jimmy Swift Band, Adrenaline, and Jon McKiel, and their unrelenting aural onslaught is an impressive one.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Grayowl Point on Community Theatre‘s Northern Register: “Where the album really shines is when this community atmosphere is the most obvious. In a clear nod to their Northern surroundings, the choir-like sounds of ‘Onward and Upward’ really give you the sense of how fun a project this really is. In a hearty ode to the majestical Aurora Borealis, the line ‘Aurora Borealis, the nighttime is your palace’ has to be my favourite, the gang of musicians show off their talented vocal chops for a harmonized treat.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Noisey includes AA Wallace‘s video for “Lipstick & Stethoscopes” in this list of Top 50 Music Videos Funded by the Government of Canada: “Bathed in Stereoscopic vision the video is the most effective direct-to-DVD sequel of BeeGee’s ‘Night Fever I’ve ever seen but with more golden glow filters and prisms. However, the video still works swell.”

See the whole list HERE.

The New Brunswick Beacon on the economic impacts of the Halifax Pop Explosion: “The Halifax Pop Explosion brings 30,000 attendees and $4.5 million back into the Nova Scotia’s capital, but its role of leader among the music festivals is felt outside the region. ‘We want to be a good community player, and for us it means that the community goes beyond Halifax,’ says festival executive director James Boyle.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Yukon Radio Dave catches up with Christine Fellows to chat about her new album/book of poetry Burning Daylight. Listen to the interview HERE.

Ride The Tempo on Dan MacCormack‘s Symphony of Ghosts: “Halifax’s Dan MacCormack’s third album is an endearing homage to the works of David Adams Richards, with each song based on one of the author’s novels. MacCormack’s rootsy folk approach is a good match to the subject matter and comes off as a fine ode of its own to the often harsh life in rural New Brunswick and its snow, snow, snow.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Charts:
#31 – Christine Fellows – Burning Daylight

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Specialty Charts:
#1
 – Slow Leaves – Beauty Is So Common
#5 - Christine Fellows - Burning Daylight

 

Week End Wrap Up • 10.03.14

Oct3-2014

AUX TV premieres the debut full-length from Legato Vipers, LV: “As far as instrumental surf goes, few Canadian bands do it as well as Legato Vipers. While the band’s built a rep based on their suds-soaked live shows, their members are also well-established members of Ontario’s music scene: Virtuoso riffage is provided by Tyler Belluz and Mike Brooks of Del Bel (a band we gave daps in our previous musings on Wavelength) and The Magic’s Jordan Howard, while Biblical’s Jay Anderson mans the kits. Together, they play roughed-up surf that skims the line between mega-accomplished and excellently trashy—it’s the stuff that reeks of pomade and plus-sized bottles of Labatt 50.”

Listen to the album and read the whole piece HERE.

Quick Before It Melts premieres the video for “Gangly Dancer” by Legato Vipers: “Legato Vipers‘ scorching hot instrumental surf rock is both a throwback to the classic 60s sound, and a throw down to any and all who want to take them on in a head-to-head guitar riff-off. The video for LV‘s first single, ‘Gangly Dancer,’ premieres on Quick Before It Melts today and it’s a groovy, retro-recycled doozy that will make you want to dance “with an air of delicate grace.”

Watch the video HERE.

Dusty Organ on Cam Smith‘s Turbo: “Synthesizers pull the listener in to ‘Gold Drapes,’ showing the well-tuned experimentation of Cam Smith and his admiration for old school synthesizers and electronic instrumentation.  The aggression-fuelled ‘Chains & Whips’ is one example of why the Haligonian MC is a force to be reckoned with in the hip-hop scene, not only measured by his lyrical ability, but by his impressive production skills. ‘Feel the Same’ brings a heavy west-coast style to the east-coast and is right up there with big-name artists.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Canadian Beats on Cam Smith‘s Turbo: “With the beats and instrumentals, I found myself wanting to dance along. The songs that stood out the most for me were ‘Feel The Same’ featuring Nicole Aria and ‘Nonsense’ featuring Kayo. If you enjoy listening to hip hop artists like Tech N9Ne, I would recommend taking a listen to Cannon.”

Read the whole review HERE.

BRBR on the debut full-length from VKNGS: “Le post-hardcore mathématique des 9 titres se dévoile de manière mécanique dans la mesure où VKNGS arrive à verrouiller une idée mélodique, assez longtemps pour rentrer sous notre peau, sans toutefois perdre en urgence. Car à défaut de s’éterniser, le groupe sait planer, au travers les détours rythmiques, les instants post-rock et le chaos saturé. Le bruit révèle une solide précision technique et une intelligence musicale que seules des années d’expérience offrent…VKNGS est une force redoutable.”

Read the whole review, en français, HERE.

Nexus on VKNGS: “The album, with seemingly random numerical track titles, is an intense mix of drums and guitar, melody, and screaming…VKNGS have a more mature sound than most bands in their genre. The album had an even balance between vocals and guitar, with neither one overpowering the other.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Manitoban on Slow Leaves‘ Beauty Is So Common: “Slow Leaves’ newest album Beauty Is So Common will have you tapping your feet and humming along to the simple, catchy guitar rhythms, and contemplating your next steps – literally and figuratively…Beauty Is So Common’s simple rhythmic nature will appeal to many, while the uplifting, pensive lyrics will evoke emotions from introspective types. When you’re looking for an album to listen to during your next all-night study session, give this one a try.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Babysue on Slow Leaves‘ Beauty Is So Common: “The songs on Beauty Is So Common come across sounding very genuine and personal, seeming almost as if Davidson was writing personal messages to a friend. The arrangements are nice and smooth, but even smoother is Grant’s voice. This guy has a voice that could melt iron. Instead of pushing himself too hard, Grant just lets the words come out naturally.”

Read the whole review HERE.

FFWD Weekly features Constantines: “From their noise-drenched, Fugazi-inspired beginnings in Guelph to their Toronto-repping swan song, Kensington Heights, the Constantines grew into one of the definitive Canadian bands of the aughts, an era when — to put it bluntly — the globe obsessed over Arcade Fire, Broken Social Scene and fistfuls of other local-grown acts. The Constantines, along with Calgary’s Chad VanGaalen, Montreal’s Wolf Parade and later, Toronto’s METZ, led the second wave of Canadians scooped up by indie behemoth Sub Pop, after Eric’s Trip, Jale and Zumpano. A pretty big deal? You bet.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

New Canadian Music on Christine FellowsBurning Daylight: “Christine Fellows has long been viewed as one of Canada’s most poetic rootsy singer/songwriters. It makes sense then that her new project, Burning Daylight, is a combined album/poetry collection. The title of the first single, “Call Of The Wild”, references London, and it has a lovely chamber-folk feel…She is right on target here.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! premieres Community Theatre‘s Northern Register: “Canadian labels Headless Owl and You’ve Changed teamed up last year to send a group of their finest artists to Whitehorse, and the result was a freshly formed supergroup called Community Theatre…Rehearsed and recorded in a Yukon cabin, the album showcases a variety of styles from the dark, breathy minimalism of ‘Engines’ to upbeat, singalong ode to the Northern Lights ‘Onward and Upward’ to grunge-y rocker ‘Snailhouse’ and finally ending up at the gorgeous, folky album closer ‘Will You Know.’ Despite the range of genres, styles and voices, there’s an undeniable thread of Canadiana and collaboration holding it all together.”

Listen to the album and read the whole piece HERE.

Mixtape Magazine premieres the debut EP from Fossil Cliffs: “Mike D’Eon has been active in the music scene for a while with bands who played music with ‘post’ attached to genre styles, post-punk band The Establishment and post-rock band Kuato. Now D’Eon debut’s his post-band album, which is just a confusing way to say he is releasing his debut solo album (Don’t worry, he’s still in Kuato). The self-titled EP was recorded in the basement of the Acadian Embassy, the home of humans and the label that shares the name. The EP has some grit, tackling personal topics head on, slashing through with some heavy sludge guitar.”

Read the whole feature and listen to the album HERE.

New Canadian Music on Graham NicholasSometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers: “If your tastes in country are more Dwight Yoakam and Daniel Romano than Keith Urban, then Graham Nicholas will be up your alley. There’s a real retro sound to his new record, Sometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers, one that complements his twangy vocal style nicely. There’s a nice mix of hurtin’ ballads (‘Heart, Please Forgive Me’ is our fave) and up-tempo toe-tappers. Fine stuff.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Earshot 20 catches up with Kuato to talk about The Great Upheaval and the Halifax Pop Explosion. Listen to the interview HERE.

BRBR previews Halifax Pop Explosion and Nova Scotia Music Week in their East Coast almanac feature. Check it out HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Weekly Charts:
#30
 – Slow Leaves – Beauty Is So Common

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Specialty Charts:
#1
 – Slow Leaves – Beauty Is So Common

 

Week End Wrap Up • 09.26.14

Sept19-2014

Winnipeg Free Press features Christine Fellows and her new album/book of poetry, Burning Daylight: “Canada’s North, in all of its resplendent beauty and biting harshness, makes for a rich muse. Just ask Christine Fellows. She mined both a full-length album and an entire book of poems from the complex and multi-faceted landscape that exists in our figurative backyard. Burning Daylight, the local singer-songwriter’s sixth studio album and first collection of poetry — released today via ARP Books — explores themes of isolation, family, frailty and dislocation through a feminist lens. The northern landscape serves not as a mere backdrop, but rather as another of Fellows’ beautifully realized characters. The project is a multimedia feast for the senses. Fellows’ poems are evocative and altering, a reminder of what can be achieved with plain language; in her hands, an ice cream pail full of rotting fish heads sounds romantic.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Vish Khanna’s Kreative Kontrol podcast features Christine Fellows: “Christine Fellows lives in Winnipeg, MB and is one of the world’s best songwriters. She is an adventurous and compelling storyteller and a gifted musician who brings her work into other disciplines for really cool collaborations. Her sixth album also includes her first book of poetry; both are called Burning Daylight and were released by ARP Books on September 23.”

Listen to the show HERE.

Exclaim! previews Subtle Hanky, the new 7″ from Force Fields: “Fredricton-based experimental prog rockers Force Fields have been crafting music together for a decade, but have just recently unleashed their first physical release — a pink and black 7-inch pressing of their debut EP Subtle Hanky. In conjunction with the EP, the band have offered up the title track for your listening pleasure. Known in their hometown as ‘an elusive but mighty force,’ the group have presented a five-minute number that comes packed with twists and turns to keep the listener interested. ”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Noisography on Force FieldsSubtle Hanky: “Having spun these two tracks back to back every other day over the last few weeks, I’m still stead fast in my assessment that these gentlemen are very likely the most talented and brilliant band on the east coast and very likely in all of Canada, in any genre. In 20 years, during the next ‘post rock’ revival (post-post-rock?) these guys will no doubt be a defining example of the genre, though to pigeon hole them to one narrow category doesn’t do justice to the jazz, rock, and electronic influences that shape their work.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Exclaim! hosts an exclusive stream of the new album from Graham Nicholas, Sometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers: “Nicholas treats the characters in his songs with honesty and empathy, delivering stories about ‘troubled and love-hungry’ people, while maintaining his irreverent sense of humour. A recent press release likens his backing players to the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and the Band, noting their ability to find ‘the right balance of warmth and grit.’  Nicholas’ wide-ranging influences are evident from the get-go with opener ‘Roll Me Up’ blending classic rock’n'roll with some serious country twang, while other tracks like ‘Wandering Angel’ and ‘Bluebird’ embrace well-loved folk tradition.”

Listen to the album HERE.

New Canadian Music on Coyote‘s Proof of Life: “Charlottetown band Coyote formed in 2011 and made friends with debut album Tracks, which earned them four Music PEI Award nominations, including Album of the Year. At East Coast Music Week 2013 Coyote was awarded the first ever People’s Choice Rising Star Award and they recently released a follow-up mini-album Proof of Life. This is accessible and melodic pop-rock fare with a hint of the ’80s in there, via the keyboard sounds. The EP was recorded crisply by Colin Buchanan (Paper Lions).”

Read the whole review HERE.

Grayowl Point on Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “In a folk based, country-tinged blend that is very popular right now, the richness to Davidson’s craft is hard to miss. The warmth in his vocals and the record’s easy pace allows Beauty is so Common to nestle in amongst your decade spanning folk/country collection or become something new to lean on when your go-to melancholic records have done their time…As Davidson suggests, beauty can be found in the most ordinary of places. One just has to look up from their screens long enough to notice. In the case of Slow Leaves’ record, finding its beauty isn’t hard at all.”

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 10 National Weekly Folk/Roots/Blues Specialty Charts:
#5
 – Slow Leaves – Beauty Is So Common

 

Week End Wrap Up • 09.19.14

Sept19-2014

BeatRoute features Christine Fellows and her new album/book of poems Burning Daylight: “Winnipeg singer-songwriter and poet Christine Fellows is aiming to bring some light to the far corners of our Canadian culture with her newest project, a song-cycle and book of poetry in collaboration with artist and friend Alicia Smith called Burning Daylight. The project intertwines haunting poetic narratives and evocative songs about the Yukon Gold Rush of yore, as well as its present struggles, all seen through a feminist lens. The idea came to her seemingly out of nowhere when she was in transit with her husband, singer-songwriter John K. Samson.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Exclaim! hosts an exclusive of the new album from Christine FellowsBurning Daylight: “The new record was inspired by Jack London stories and Canada’s sprawling North — beginning when Fellows served as the songwriter-in-residence at the Dawson City Music Festival in the Yukon, and spurred on by a trip to Nunavut with the National Film Board. Burning Daylight channels the wild of the Canadian North into refined and sometimes haunting piano-driven folk songs that highlight Fellows’ gorgeous voice. Sure to be a Canadian treasure for some time to come…”

Listen to the album HERE.

NOW Toronto on Christine Fellows‘ Burning Daylight: “Like the Spartan landscape she describes, Fellows’s music is appropriately austere, antique yet avant-garde, and quietly theatrical. Her piano, pump organ, uke and melodeon are backed by a couple of cellists/multi-instrumentalists, plus touches of horn and percussion and lots of backup vocals. There’s a palpable sense of running on ‘Call Of The Wild’ that contrasts with ‘To Build A Fire’’s low, heavy chords and the plaintive beauty of the opening title track.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Uniter features Christine Fellows and Burning Daylight: “‘I’ve been to lots of poetry readings and I love poetry, but I’ve never put the pen to paper with that idea in mind,’ she says. ‘Something about that workshop led by Jennifer (Still, local poet) just clicked: I put away music completely and just started writing poetry. Every morning I would stumble over to my desk and start writing. It was like a fever and it reminded me of the urgency I felt when I first started writing songs. Writing music is more like piecing together a puzzle while writing poetry seems like a much freer activity and there’s more room to go outside of the lines, which I really enjoy.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

The Examiner features The Weather Station and her new EP, What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “It’s just this little release: I have a full-length I’ve been working on. This is just something to bridge the gap, and we really liked some of the songs and wanted to make this little release. I met some people in North Carolina who said ‘Why don’t you come record with us?’ And I did, and it was really awesome. I couldn’t believe how good it sounded. And I was recording with my friend Dan (who recorded my last record) in his basement, and then I noticed that all these songs kind of went together, and it worked well in the short format. So I put them all together.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Quick Before It Melts on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Tamara Lindeman has ben busy with All Of It Was Mine producer Daniel Romano and members of Megafaun working on a number of new songs that have found a home on a new, limited edition 12″, 45 rpm EP called What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know. With Romano in his Welland ON studio and Megafaun in North Carolina, Lindeman created a unique, self-contained collection.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Indy Week on The Weather Station‘s What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “As The Weather Station, Toronto singer-songwriter Tamara Lindeman makes placid music about fretful searches—for love, for contentment, for something more stable than the changing chords of a three-minute folk song. If that tension was a ripple on the 2011 LP All of It Was Mine, it’s turned into waves for the forthcoming What Am I Going to Do with Everything I Know?, a transfixing seven-song set due in October.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

BRBR on Coyote‘s Proof of Life: “Ce deuxième effort pourrait très bien se nommer preuve de pop. Il faut le dire, la bande sonore feels good du mois, Coyote le fait à fond, car le groupe originaire de Charlottetown incarne l’exubérance joviale du début de la vingtaine. Allons-y donc avec une sorte d’hommage à ‘All My Friends’ de LCD Soundsystem, entrecoupé d’une power pop rebondissante (‘Proof of Life’) et de tounes pop parfaites, où le facteur danse n’enlève rien à l’intelligence musicale de Coyote (‘Old News’). Mentionnons également au passage les tonalités de guitares huppées de ‘Melody Maker.’ Même la nostalgie des années 2000 coule tout naturellement dans les chants de gang de ‘Future Love.’ Chapeau, la bande semble prête à passer au prochain niveau.”

Read the whole review, en français, HERE.

Vue Weekly features Coyote and their new album Proof of Life: “‘The first EP we did in 2013 was just a collection of ideas, because we needed something to give to people. For Proof of Life we thought about how to approach the songs, stepping back and thinking of a theme or way to tie them together. It turned out that the theme was already there: light-hearted, upbeat, good memory stuff about our last six years. Growing up but still being young, with a few moments of intense darkness thrown in, which is what these years are like, really.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Exclaim! hosts an exclusive stream of Cam Smith‘s latest, Cannon: “Halifax hip-hop figure Cam Smith is just about ready to explode, with his new Cannon LP set to go off later this month…The album features Smith detailing decadent, all-week benders spent with sinners on tracks like ‘Turbo,’ driving into hard-hitting dancehall territory on ‘Nonsense,’ and turning up with XXX CLVR on the strip club-set, glamour-grabbing ‘Gold Drapes.’”

Listen to the album HERE.

Americana UK on Bend The River‘s So Long Joan Fontaine: “It’s an ambitious album, yet all seven players get it right. Never veering haphazardly into self-indulgence, they instead nail a groove that makes the album and sound familiar, nostalgic and, importantly, natural. From the opening hook of ‘Jenny and the Night Before’ right through to the closing jaunt of ‘The Echo and The Sway,’ there’s a playfulness woven through the varying emotions and styles. ‘The Hunter in Me’ is particularly good fun, while ‘No One Else to Blame’ is a beautiful slice of sad country. Excellent stuff.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Killer Baby Tomatoes previews “Nineteen, the single from the VKNGS self-titled LP: “Halifax post punk band VKNGS are prepping the release of their first full-length after eight years together, and you can stream the crushing ‘Nineteen’ off the self-titled LP now. ”

Listen to the track HERE.

Exclaim! rolls out details of the debut full-length from Legato Vipers, LV: “Ontario surf rockers Legato Vipers previously worked with Shadowy Men on a Shadowy Planet’s Don Pyle on an EP, but the group are now preparing to take their first full-length leap. LV is due out on October 7. The album was captured live-to-tape at Guelph’s Boogie Barn with engineer/mixer Harri Palm. The 13 songs were performed by the lineup of guitarists Mike Brooks (Bry Webb & the Providers, Gregory Pepper & His Problems) and Jordan Howard (the Skeletones Four, Jim Guthrie Band), bassist Tyler Belluz (Del Bel, Chrome & the Ice Queen), and drummer Jay Anderson (Biblical, Maylee Todd, Sandro Perri Band).”

Read the whole piece HERE.

NOW Toronto previews the Bloor Ossington Folk Festival in their Fall Music Guide: “The good folks behind Bloor Ossington Folk Festival have done it again: three days of free music in and around Christie Pitts while it’s still nice enough to sit on the grass. The neighbourhood festival’s fourth-year lineup includes Julie Doiron and the Wrong Guys, Brendan Canning, AroarA, Fiver, Eamon McGrath, Shotgun Jimmie, Baby Eagle and many others.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

Silent Shout on Double Tooth‘s “You Should Buy Myself A Drink”: “It’s all a very cool journey through 60’s Nigerian afrobeat with interestingly cinematic twists of jazz, space-rock and modern music. The brand new project is composed of Robbie Grunwald (Fender Rhodes, Micromoog, Roland Juno 8, bass, guitar, glockenspiel, congas, hand claps)  and Joshua Van Tassel (drums, congas, shakers, misc percussion, glockenspiel, hand claps, psycedelics).  What we really fell in love with were the simply sweet analog synth lines scattered throughout.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Weekly Charts:
#46
 – Vogue Dots – Toska

Week End Wrap Up • 09.12.14

Sept5

Exclaim! on Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “The mellow quality of Davidson’s voice has drawn comparisons to the likes of Doug Paisley and JJ Cale, while the overall sound of the record brings to mind the California country-folk singer/songwriter albums of the early ’70s (he would have been a fitting inmate on that era’s Asylum label). There is just enough variety in the tempos and tones of the songs here to maintain your interest, allowing the material’s subtle strengths to win you over. This is an album of uncommon beauty.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Digital Journal on Slow Leaves‘ Beauty Is So Common: “Beauty is So Common definitely takes things to another level. A lot of emotion comes through in the lyrics and performance. But what really stands out is Davidson’s voice. To me, this has always been his strongest asset. Deep and rich with just a hint of vibrato, there is a sense of familiarity that just draws the listener in. There is an intimacy created here.The songs themselves range from quiet ballads to faster tempo upbeat songs, some with a bit of quirk, but all fall within the folk/alt-country spectrum.”

Read the whole review HERE.

New Canadian Music on Slow Leaves‘ Beauty Is So Common: “…hits one out of the park with new album Beauty Is So Common. He wrote all the well-crafted material, and sings it in a warm relaxed style that has been compared to Doug Paisley. The sound suggests the best California folk-rock of the ’70s. One beautiful album. Let’s hope for live dates soon.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Gazette on Slow Leaves‘ Beauty Is So Common: “The album showcases the natural beauty of Slow Leaves poetic lyrics, accompanied by a melodic Americana folk instrumental with pop style harmonies. Every track sounds unique. The final product is comparable to other Canadian folk artists such as City in Colour and Great Lake Swimmers. Tracks range from more upbeat country tinged tracks like ‘Life of a Better Man,’ to easygoing and subtle melodies, such as ‘Institution.’ Slow Leaves provides a collection of polished and well written ear candy.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Dusty Organ on Cam Smith‘s “Mad Crack” video: “Haligonian Cam Smith has released his second single from his upcoming album Cannon, set to be released October 1st. ‘Mad Crack’ is a top-notch track showing Smith is a force to be reckoned with - but the music video is on an entirely different level. Check it out in full screen if you dare.”

Read more HERE.

Hip Hop Canada makes Cam Smith‘s “Mad Crack” their Song of the Day: “Dave Hung directs the new visuals from Dartmouth’s own Cam Smith. The gore-filled ‘Mad Crack’ pays tribute to the ’80s horror film, Street Trash. This video is a follow up to Smith’s recent video drop for his lead single ‘Turbo’ featuring xxx clvr. Both songs are featured on his long-awaited upcoming album, Cannon, which is set for release September 30. Cuts were provided by award-winning DJ Plaeboi and the song was mixed/mastered by Corey LeRue.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Exclaim! rolls out details of the debut full-length from VKNGS: “Long-running Halifax unit VKNGS have been grinding it out onstage and on short-format releases for close to eight years, but the band have now finally unveiled plans for a proper full-length. Their self-titled debut album arrives on LP September 16 through Noyes/Acadian Embassy. Like their three-song 12-inch from 2007, the record appears on clear vinyl and comes in a see-through plastic sleeve. Included are nine numbers that were recorded between 2008 and 2011, with a mastering job from Ron Bates completed in 2013.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

The Coast hosts an exclusive stream of the self-titled VKNGS full-length: “It took eight years, but it’ll cause about eight years of eardrum damage in one go—so don’t fret, VKNGS didn’t forget about your post-hardcore needs all these years. The debut full-length will be released Tuesday, September 16 by both Noyes Records and Acadian Embassy on clear vinyl. Inside the vinyl will be fine, angular, very noisy and sludgy beauty from a band comprised of members of North of America, The Holy Shroud, Union of the Snake, Jon Mckiel, Jimmy Swift Band, Adrenaline and Gorbage.”

Listen to the entire album HERE.

One Chord To Another previews The Weather Station‘s upcoming What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Today one of my favourite labels You’ve Changed Records announced that they will release a new The Weather Station EP in October. What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know is a limited edition 6 song 45 RPM 12″ EP (also digital). I’m really looking forward to this one, because her earlier releases All Of It Was Mine and the Duets series are both so amazing. ”

Read the whole piece HERE.

The London Free Press previews a Fearing & White tour stop in London, ON: “Fearing & White, which teams Canadian folk star Stephen Fearing and Belfast-tied singer-songwriter Andy White, plays Aeolian Hall on Saturday. Fearing also plays with Blackie & The Rodeo Kings, while White has collaborated with Peter Gabriel, Sinead O’Connor, and Neil and Tim Finn. They’ll be joined on Saturday by drummer Gary Craig. The band is touring in support Fearing & White’s new album Tea And Confidences.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

One Chord To Another previews Community Theatre‘s Northern Register: “…there’s indeed a collaboration album coming from some of my biggest Canadian heroes. Community Theatre will include Mathias Kom (the Burning Hell), Kyle Cashen (Old Time Machine), Chris Adeney (Wax Mannequin), Michael Feuerstack (formerly known as Snailhouse), Steve Lambke (Baby Eagle), Ian Kehoe (Marine Dreams), Jim Kilpatrick (Shotgun Jimmie), Richard Laviolette, and Colleen Collins and David Trenaman (Construction & Destruction). That’s almost a dream-like line-up and I can’t wait to hear the album when it arrives.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

BRBR on Coyote‘s Proof of Life: “Si le groupe roule sa bosse sur la Côte Est canadienne depuis 2010, Proof Of Life marque un tournant pour la bande, réputée pour la solidité de sa pop en spectacle…Les membres du groupe affirment que si le concept de proof of lifedemeure objectif, il sert de synthèse de l’esprit qui habite l’exubérance de Coyote, autant dans ses hameçons que dans les textes. Coyote carbure au moment présent, comme en témoigne sa quête depreuves de vie. C’est dans ce contexte que le groupe aura l’occasion de savourer leur première tournée nationale, une réalité qui semblait impossible il y a six mois.”

Read the whole feature, en français, HERE.

Finally, here is a re-cap of some of our clients that have hit the earshot! charts over the past week:

Top 50 National Weekly Charts:
#48
 – Jon McKiel – Jon McKiel

Top 10 National Folk/Roots/Blues Charts:
#10
 – Graham Nicholas – Sometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers

Top 200 National Monthly Charts for July 2014:
#25
 – Vogue Dots – Toska
#33 – Kuato - The Great Upheaval
#63 – Nap Eyes - Whine of the Mystic
#67 – Jon McKiel - Jon McKiel
#188 – José Contreras – José Contreras

Week End Wrap Up • 09.05.14

Sept5

Exclaim! hosts an exclusive stream of the new album from Slow Leaves, Beauty Is So Common: “The record combines Davidson’s knack for storytelling with his heartfelt vocals. There’s an alt-country twang to what he does, with his music described as ‘deeply rooted in the genuine and honest, rich in melody and sung from the heart of downtown.’ Impressed by the production on fellow Winnipeggers Imaginary Cities’ debut record, Davidson got in touch with the duo’s Rusty Matyas and Beauty Is So Common is the result of that collaboration.”

Listen to the album HERE.

The Winnipeg Free Press on Slow Leaves‘ Beauty Is So Common: “Beauty Is So Common, which will be fêted with a CD release party at the West End Cultural Centre on Sept. 6, is most certainly a contribution. It’s a gorgeously rendered, hyper-melodic folk album that shimmers with pure-pop production, Davidson’s rich vocal timbre anchoring those affecting cinematic sweeps and swells.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Metro Winnipeg on Slow Leaves‘ Beauty Is So Common: “Beauty Is So Common sees Davidson taking a chance, adding pop harmonies and arrangements to his folk and country sound…Helping Davidson shine up his hard-luck sound was producer Rusty Matyas of Winnipeg indie-pop band Imaginary Cities and Saskatoon rock group The Sheepdogs. ‘I think we struck a good balance,’ Davidson says. ‘I was definitely cautious to go too far into a sparkly kind of pop production, you know, heavy synths or electronic beats. I definitely wasn’t going into that territory. I felt like my songs were strengthened (by working with Matyas) and I didn’t lose ownership of them by any means.’”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Scruffy The Yak on Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “Winnipeg’s Slow Leaves (Grant Davidson) are (is) releasing a brand-spankin’ new album entitled Beauty Is So Common on September 6 at the West End Cultural Centre. Beauty Is So Common should park Slow Leaves in the same field as singer-songwriters such as Ron Sexsmith and Scott Nolan, fellas that somehow manage to create fresh songs that already sound classic, gimmick-free and devoid of any need to be pigeon-holed into genres such as alt-country. Is it folk? Is it pop? Country? Who cares?”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Uniter features Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common: “Grant Davidson, now known to Winnipeg folk music fans as Slow Leaves, stopped playing music only as a hobby while working at his newest album Beauty Is So Common. ‘Part of making the record I always wanted to make came from the fact that I just really wanted to take music more seriously,’ says 34-year-old Davidson. ‘Previously I made music while working a day job, but this time the big difference was I quit my job and just decided to take that risk. It really forced me to put much more of my focus on making music and actually trying to build a career out of it.’”

Read the whole piece HERE.

CBC Music includes Slow LeavesBeauty Is So Common in their list of ’15 albums you need to hear in September.’ See the whole list HERE.

The Cadre on Slow Leaves‘ Beauty Is So Common: “I was excited to get back to The Cadre this year and start writing and reviewing again, but much of what was waiting for me in the office left a lot to be desired or was just a bit too strange. So when I popped Beauty is So Common into my laptop, I was pleasantly surprised. Beauty is So Common is the latest album from Slow Leaves, which is the recording alias for Winnipegger Grant Davidson. The singer-songwriter partnered with producer Rusty Matyas on this album after expressing admiration for his previous work with Imaginary Cities. The result is ten very strong tracks.”

Read the whole review HERE.

The Chronicle Herald features Nova Scotia Music Week: “Over 100 acts will perform at eight venues around the town during the four-day event. Instead of a gala awards celebration, Long said organizers opted for a big-name concert at the Rath East Link Community Centre featuring Blue Rodeo.For Truro, the event, expected to draw 5,000 visitors to performances, is about more than celebrating Nova Scotia musicians. It’s good business for the downtown core. ‘We are starting to change our attitudes about what should, can and must be done to continue to grow this area,’ Truro Mayor Bill Mills said Tuesday of the importance culture can play to the local economy.”

Read the whole feature HERE.

Music Nova Scotia Executive Director Scott Long stops by Global Morning Halifax to talk about Nova Scotia Music Week. Watch the interview below:

Exclaim! previews the latest release from Graham NicholasSometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers: “Some days you get chicken, some days it’s feathers, but on September 30 it will be Sometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers. That’s the name of the new album from Ontario songwriter Graham Nicholas. The album was recorded at London, ON’s Sugar Shack Studios with returning producer Aaron Comeau (Sam Cash & the Romantic Dogs, Dear Sister), who also helmed last year’s Ruby, and Other Bedtime Stories EP.”

Read the whole piece HERE.

The Permanent Rain Press previews “Wandering Angel” by Graham Nicholas: “Graham Nicholas has released ‘Wandering Angel,’ the first single off his upcoming debut album, Sometimes Chicken, Sometimes Feathers. The full-length will be released September 30th, and will find the country artist “honing in on his concise form of storytelling and refining his irreverent sense of humor.”

Listen to the track HERE.

Exclaim! on the latest from The Weather Station, What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know: “Following last year’s duet series, the Weather Station (a.k.a. Toronto folkie Tamara Lindeman) has announced plans to issue an EP this fall and a new full-length in 2015. Up first will be the six-song mini-release What Am I Going to Do with Everything I Know, which arrives through You’ve Changed Records on October 14…The limited-edition 12-inch release presents interconnected songs on each side, with the first trio of tracks acting as ‘a meditation on knowledge,’ and the flipside being ‘a love story in three parts.’”

Read all the details HERE.

Wondering Sound on “What Am I Going To Do With Everything I Know” by The Weather Station: “It’s been three years since Tamara Lindeman (aka the Weather Station) released All of It Was Mine, a stunning collection of spare, timeless folksongs. Her new track ‘What Am I Going to Do (With Everything I Know),’ off a forthcoming EP of the same name, sounds like a more collaborative effort, with rich backing vocals and expanded instrumentation. The percussionless song starts with delicately fingerpicked acoustic guitar, and swells with a soft bass line and lap-steel guitar.”

Read the whole preview HERE.

Canuckistan Music on Slight Birching‘s Cultural Envelope: “The Vancouver-based singer-songwriter trades in the same sort of lo-fi folk that made Bill Callahan’s work as Smog so compelling, which is to say sparse, off-kilter songs that wallow in that beautiful sadness…Some of his songs are dismally minimal, almost like roughed-out demos, which I suppose was the effect Ramsay was looking for. But it’s the subtler touches, like the shimmering synthesizers that augment a song like ‘Beacon Hill’ or the jarring intro to ‘Autodidact’, that take the record beyond your standard stoner folk.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Noisey premieres Cam Smith‘s “Mad Crack” video: “‘Mad Crack’ pays homage to 1987 melt-movie Street Trash, with visual allusions to the Tenafly Viper wine that turns thirsty junkyard hobos into gruesome ooze. It’s a badass cult-horror flick that informs the apocalyptic aesthetics of Cam Smith’s neon crack house. But it’s not just any crack; it’s Cam Smith’s mad crack and it liquefies his rap competition. Best be careful when you’re buying shit in back alleys.”

Read the whole piece HERE and watch the video below.

Exclaim! hosts an exclusive stream of the new Coyote EP, Proof of Life: “Opener ‘Your House’ begins with a piano figure reminiscent of LCD Soundsystem’s ‘All Your Friends’ before swelling to a surging rock climax. Elsewhere on Proof of Life, there’s a hint of funk to the palm-muted guitar licks on the dance-rock grooves of ‘Old News,’ while the title track is the most urgently upbeat song here, and closing cut ‘Toothache’ is delivered with quiet restraint before swelling to a cinematic (yet still fairly restrained) finale.”

Listen to the album HERE.

The Uniter on the debut solo album from José Contreras: “The record is endearing and haunting, light on instruments and heavy on the heartstrings. Contreras doesn’t rely on heavy production or a wide array of instruments, instead layering vocals over his own guitar and piano playing. By Divine Right fans will recognize all of the songs from their previous records, but Contreras reworks these pieces without a band to back him up.”

Read the whole review HERE.

Silent Shout on the new single from Vogue Dots, “Way Out” : “Another gem has washed up on the East Coast shoreline thanks to Vogue Dots. This time around they’ve gone a bit darker. A shoegazey wall of sound meets their usual left-field pop with “Way Out,” a single released on the amazing Cascine label. The track starts out as a sort of exotic noisy jungle island filled with echoed bird noises which reminds us of Southern Shores (also on Cascine). Then a warm wall of sound hits us like a ton of feathers: loud, distorted and fluffy. The only problem with the song is it just ends too soon.”

Read the whole review HERE.